1 uBTC(BTC) to BTC (Microbit to Bitcoin) | convert

/r/Bitcoin FAQ - Newcomers please read

Welcome To The /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

Maybe you're here because you've received a tip on social media, or maybe you've just been hearing a lot recently about Bitcoin and are wondering what the big deal is? The following videos are a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little bit about its long term potential:

What are Bitcoins worth and where can I buy them?

Bitcoins are valued at what market price people are willing to pay for them. Here are a couple useful sites 1 and 2 that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".
You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin (from as little as $1 worth) and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank account. Some recommendations include:
US & Europe
Australia
China
All countries
Always do your own personal due diligence on the validity of an exchange and check the URL prior to sending them money or entering login credentials. Phishing sites are not uncommon. Use this checklist if you aren't sure which exchange to choose.

Where can I spend Bitcoins?

A comprehensive list can be found at TheBitcoinPage.com but some of the key ones are below:
Store Product
Microsoft Xbox games, phone apps and software
Spendabit and The Bitcoin Shop Search engines of online retailers accepting bitcoin with millions of results
Overstock Everything under the sun
Gyft Gift cards for thousands of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, etc.
Reddit Gold Premium membership which can be gifted to others
NewEgg, TigerDirect and Dell For all your electronic needs
Expedia, Cheapair and 9flats For when you need to get away
Wordpress, Namecheap, Mullvad and PIA Handy web services
Foodler and Takeaway Takeout delivered to your door!
HumbleBundle and GreenmanGaming For when you need to get your game on
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. UK residents can find a comprehensive directory of shops, pubs, websites and other places in the UK that accept bitcoins at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations, such as Wikipedia, Red Cross and the RNLI. You can find a longer list here.

Merchant Resources

If you operate a business and want to accept bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available:

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun hobby but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The friendly folks at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network, you can run a full node by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions. Here is a handy setup guide

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can be your own bank and personally secure your bitcoins or you can use trusted companies such as Coinbase and Circle which have secured wallets where they hold the bitcoins for you and provide insurance. Be sure to only deal with reputable companies, if you have any concerns about a company's trustworthiness just ask or check their consumer reviews and ratings.
If you prefer to have direct control over your coins without having to use a trusted third party you can use personal wallets for desktops / laptops, Android and iOS where you alone hold your private keys. Electrum, Mycelium and Breadwallet are popular, but there are many options.
Find a wallet that works best for you
For increased security use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email! (2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account, usually from a text message or app, making it much harder for thieves to gain access). Google Authenticator and Authy are two great apps for handling 2FA.
Additional security systems such as Mycelium Entropy (for printing multi-signature paper wallets) and the Trezor Hardware Wallet are great ways to easily secure your coins. Or, you can opt to secure your bitcoin using cold storage.
Note: Do not use brainwallets unless you are an expert, they are known to be vulnerable to theft unless set up correctly.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can earn bitcoins by working for them. Here are a few resources for bitcoin jobs.

Tipping

Bitcoin Units

Note: This is a brief overview to the most commonly used Bitcoin units. For full information check out the Bitcoin Units wiki (work in progress).
One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common ones are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin SI unit for milli i.e. millilitre (ml) or millimeter (mm)
microbitcoin μBTC 1,000,000 per bitcoin SI unit for micro i.e microlitre (μl) or micrometre (μm)
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin Smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $500 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
Still have questions? The friendly folks at /BitcoinBeginners would be happy to help you out. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit.
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending mod approval. The original sticky can still be found here.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BashCo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Suggestion for useful subunit in today's 10K+ world

Hello Bitcoiners,
(This is focused on the US dollar) - For those of us who believe in Bitcoin as a currency, as an exchange convenience, we have used subunits ever since a single bitcoin reached certain heights. As the price approached $1,000, the millibitcoin (0.001 BTC) became the closest to a US dollar and thus the most reasonable way to talk about everyday prices in BTC. For example, when I went to my favorite diner back in the day, a typical meal was 60 or so millibits. Those days are long gone.
But as of writing, a single millibit is just under $19.
The next unit down I've seen in all Bitcoin articles is the microbit - currently worth just under 2 pennies. Handy for talking about buying lollipops but not really for things like a tank of gas.
A now-obsolete French double prefix was the decimilli-, 10-4, shortened to "dimi-".
A "dimibitcoin" is today worth about $1.90.
So I suggest the use of the dimibit as a subunit of a bitcoin. Thoughts?
submitted by yokwe_phil to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why wallets should have built in price conversion

We periodically see posts suggesting that "1 Bitcoin" at $1000, $2000, $3000, $4000 sounds too expensive, and results in an off-putting pack of zeros after the decimal point when purchasing your kombucha.
Folks then plead for the community to finally switch to millibits or to microbits but call them "bits" for short. Arguments tediously play out again about what the best unit is, and what the best thing to call it, or whether we should switch to the tonal number system, or whether people should just get over themselves stop being irrationally uncomfortable with paying .000222 bitcoin for a cup of coffee.
After that, everyone goes back to measuring everything in 100,000,000 satoshi units. Here is a post from 4 years ago called It's bits which was submitted about 4 years ago.
And all of that ignores the fact that tomorrow the cup of coffee is likely to have a different price, measured in bitcoin. Which is a problem! Critics have rightly observed that no one would dare take out a large loan in a deflating currency, and it would be psychologically difficult to rejoice over your annual pay cut in quite the same way you enjoy getting a raise.
People think of the "unit of account" function as being central to the definition of currency, but Satoshi didn't choose that as a design goal. Instead, he gave us this fixed issuance curve and let the price chips fall where they may. It's part of what makes bitcoin more like a "base metal as scarce as gold", that is to say more like a commodity and less like a currency.
Sure, volatility has gone down in the last 8 years, but what you really want from a unit of account is no volatility at all. We would have some measurement of value that is stable over time -- let's call it the Jolly for making the point. A meal at a fast food place should probably cost 10 to 100 Jollies. A meal at a nice restaurant might be 10 to 1000 Jollies. Something like that. That's a range of quantity of value that people seem to find convenient to work with and think about, if you look around at a lot of national currencies.
We don't have the Jolly right now, and getting global consensus on a definition of one would be tough. Maybe some day.
In the mean time, what makes sense to use as a unit of account is your local good-enough fiat currency unit. Mind you, we are not going to use the filthy government money itself, just borrow the unit as a measurement of value. The unit has merit, is free to use, and has no downsides that I can see. (If your local currency is unstable, you could just use the Dollar, Euro, Yen, Yuan, Pound or whatever relatively stable currency is most popular where you are.)
It doesn't make sense to use Bitcoin as a unit of account, and nobody really does it because the people who have tried have been burned. So when you think of "1 Bitcoin" think of it more like you are saying "1 Kilogram of the commodity called bitcoin." Buy your coffee with bitcoin, measured in dollars. Take out your loan in euros, payable with Bitcoin.
But here's the thing, wallets need to support this way of thinking. They need to measure bitcoin balances and amount you are sending or requesting in regional units that the user chooses. To support that, they are going to need to know the exchange rate. Exchanges, Winkelvii and others could offer web service calls or RSS feeds of whatever, and users could choose the sources they prefer. Wallets could sanity check the sources and provide alarms when sources are too far apart, or change a lot in a short period of time. They should also print the exchange rate prominently so that the user can also check it for sanity.
TLDR: Wallets should allow the user to select a regional currency, and their balances and transactions should display measurements in that unit of account.
submitted by moral_agent to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

/r/oBitcoin FAQ - Novatos por favor leiam

Bem vindo ao /oBitcoin FAQ fixada

O texto que se encontra aqui foi desenvolvido por Mtzrkov e outros em Github.com/btcbrdev/oBitcoin e está em domínio público para ser usado livremente por qualquer um.

O que é bitcoin?

Bitcoin (BTC ou XBT) é o primeiro e mais importante dinheiro eletrônico sem autoridade central, baseado numa tecnologia open-source inédita chamada Blockchain, que foi desenvolvida por Satoshi Nakamoto em janeiro de 2009. Essa tecnologia permite a criação de um "banco de dados" confiável P2P (ponto-a-ponto), o que abre caminho para muitos tipos de inovação, sendo uma delas o próprio bitcoin e outras como contratos descentralizados, por exemplo.
Nota: normalmente emprega-se "Bitcoin" em maiúsculo para se referir ao protocolo (baseado na tecnologia Blockchain) e em minúsculo "bitcoin" para se referir a uma unidade da moeda.
O Bitcoin, além de um bem digital, pode ser considerado também um sistema de pagamento, totalmente independente de qualquer sistema já existente, como cartões de crédito, Paypal, bancos e outros. Sua capacidade atual estimada é de 7 transações por segundo, mas essa capacidade pode ser aumentada com o passar do tempo se houver necessidade. Por ser puramente digital e distribuído, o Bitcoin funciona 24/7 e tem alcance mundial, além de ter locais especializados de troca pela moeda local (chamados exchange) nas principais cidades do mundo.
A segurança da rede do Bitcoin, ou seja, o que garante que não existirá um chamado "gasto duplo" do mesmo dinheiro, é o consenso da rede P2P feito pela validação das transações por parte dos mineradores. Para que um minerador consiga incluir um bloco válido na rede, ele precisa utilizar um grande poder computacional. O processo de mineração consiste na realização de cálculos matemáticos para a seleção de quais transações válidas serão incluídas no próximo novo bloco do Blockchain, excluindo aquelas que tiveram uma tentativa de "gasto duplo" naquele período. Cada nó da rede, além dos mineradores, também é capaz de verificar a validade das transações incluídas no bloco. É nesse processo também que aparecem os "bitcoins ainda não descobertos". A distribuição dos bitcoins é feita de forma previsível, tendo uma queda de recompensa pela metade de 4 em 4 anos. Serão encontrados no máximo 21 milhões de unidades da moeda.

Quanto vale um bitcoin?

O preço de mercado de um bitcoin é determinado através da lei da oferta e da procura, portanto estando sujeito a variações de preço por causa de acontecimentos políticos e econômicos (como desvalorização e inflação de moedas estatais, conflitos, maior demanda por Bitcoin etc).
Assim como nas moedas estatais, o preço do bitcoin varia e pode ser diferente dependendo do lugar em que for negociado.
Se você for comprar dólares no Brasil, você terá que procurar uma casa de câmbio que poderá ter a cotação de R$ 3,00 por dólar, por exemplo. Caso vá a outra casa de câmbio, você poderá notar que o preço poderá ser ligeiramente diferente, além das taxas também variarem. Com o Bitcoin não é diferente. Essa variação entre as exchanges (nome comumente usado para se refererir aos locais de compra e venda de bitcoin) são equilibradas pelo mercado através de operações de arbitragem (comprar num lugar mais barato e vender num mais caro).
Para se ter uma ideia do preço médio do bitcoin, você pode dar uma olhada em sites como os que seguem:
Para um gráfico do preço ao longo do tempo, acesse:

Volatilidade

Por ser uma moeda ainda muito recente (inventada em jan/2009) e ainda não muito utilizada, seu preço de mercado ainda é muito volátil. Isso faz do bitcoin um investimento de risco atualmente. O preço tende a ficar mais estável ao longo do tempo, quando o mercado puder definir com mais exatidão seu "preço real". As oscilações também tendem a diminuir conforme o seu market cap (quantidade de moedas x preço) aumentar. Hoje (2015) o market cap do bitcoin é de US$ 3 bi, o que pode ser considerado pouco se comparado ao valor de algumas empresas como a Dell (US$ 24 bi) ou ainda de outras commodities como o ouro (US$ 2.600 bi).
Para um gráfico da volatidade ao longo do tempo, acesse:

Como obter bitcoins?

O bitcoin é um bem digital e assim como outros bens, pode ser adquirido de diversas formas:

1. Negociação direta (P2P / pessoa a pessoa)

Uma das maneiras mais baratas de se negociar bitcoins, porque não tem taxas, é comprando diretamente de outras pessoas que já possuem a moeda. As duas partes chegam a um acordo de preço e a troca é feita. Geralmente quem tem menos reputação entrega o bitcoin ou a moeda local primeiro.
Por ser uma maneira relativamente arriscada, pois não há um mediador para casos de descumprimento de uma das partes, a reputação de alguém deve ser muito considerada. Exemplo: prefira negociar com alguém do seu círculo de amizades (rede de confiança), alguém que você confie muito como familiares e amigos, ou por uma indicação (amigo de amigo). Se a outra parte tem uma reputação duvidosa, prefira negociar aos poucos (divida os valores em várias partes menores e vá trocando aos poucos).
Algumas ferramentas auxiliam nesse processo de reputação e rede de confiança, sendo elas:

2. Negociação indireta (com intermediário)

Outra forma de se negociar bitcoins (e essa provavelmente é a maneira mais conveniente, embora não seja a mais barata) é utilizando um intermediário que viabilize a compra e venda de bitcoins entre pessoas interessadas. Esses intermediários são as "corretoras" ou "bolsas" de bitcoins (mais conhecidas por exchanges).
Essas corretoras fornecem um serviço de intermediação entre compradores e vendedores de bitcoin, cobrando uma taxa para tal. Por causa disso o bitcoin nas corretoras tem um preço final um pouco mais alto do que se fosse comprar de outras maneiras, mas devido ao altíssimo volume, uma operação pode ser realizada instantaneamente.
Além de usar exchanges, você também pode encontrar um intermediário na relação P2P, tornando-a mais segura. Exemplo: um amigo em comum, que pode levar uma comissão previamente combinada para intermediar as duas partes.
Você pode conferir uma lista de corretoras no ExchangeWar. Algumas das principais corretoras brasileiras são:

Onde gastar bitcoins?

Hoje é virtualmente possível gastar os bitcoins em qualquer lugar, usando algum intermediário para trocá-los imediatamente sob demanda por alguma moeda local, como numa exchange ou com serviços como Neteller, Xapo ou Gyft.
Alguns locais porém já aceitam a moeda digital diretamente, como é o caso da Microsoft, Dell e Overstock, além de inúmeras outras ao redor do mundo.
Confira uma lista com mais de 100 mil lugares que já aceitam diretamente o bitcoin em SpendBitcoins ou no CoinMap.
Segue algumas listas de locais que aceitam bitcoin no Brasil:

Como minerar bitcoins?

Para minerar bitcoins você precisa executar um software em um computador especializado (ASIC) que possa realizar uma grande quantidade de operações matemáticas demandada pelo sistema de consenso P2P do bitcoin.
Logo após a criação do Bitcoin em 2009, era possível e rentável minerar bitcoins utilizando o processamento de computadores pessoais (através de simples processadores e placas de vídeo), mas com o tempo essa atividade deixou de ser rentável e tornou-se praticamente impossível para tais máquinas. Isso aconteceu pois o interesse no Bitcoin aumentou muito, trazendo assim mais pessoas para a mineração e impulsionando uma corrida por maior quantidade de processamento. Com o avanço da tecnologia e o aumento do interesse por Bitcoin, mais poder de processamento foi adicionado à rede Bitcoin e isso resultou em um aumento da dificuldade para se encontrar novos Blocos.
Essa é uma característica do protocolo Bitcoin: quanto maior o poder de processamento da rede, maior a dificuldade para se minerar bitcoins - ou seja, maior a dificuldade para se descobrir novos Blocos. Um bloco é um arquivo que possui uma identificação (data, hora e informações genéricas) e um registro das transações (movimentação de bitcoins entre endereços) mais recentes. Resumidamente, os mineradores são uma forma de manter a rede Bitcoin segura e operante, algo que demanda muito poder de processamento (o que torna inviável o uso computadores de propósito geral para tal fim) e que, como retribuição por essa tarefa importante, gera uma recompensa em bitcoins pelo trabalho.
Todas as transações, ou seja, as movimentações em bitcoins realizadas entre endereços (carteiras), são anônimas pois se caracterizam como uma transferência de fundos de um endereço Bitcoin para outro, que, embora tenham relação indireta com pessoas reais, não possuem uma relação direta. Ou seja, não é possível dizer com absoluta certeza que determinada pessoa é detentora de um endereço a menos que ela diga isso em algum lugar - o que torna o Bitcoin algo pseudônimo, não anônimo (você é anônimo apenas se quiser e tiver conhecimentos para tal). Todas as transações da história da rede Bitcoin são públicas e podem ser conferidas em sites como o Blockchain Info.
Então...é impossível minerar hoje em dia num PC comum ou notebook? Sim, mas não é lucrativo. Para isso existem os ASICs (Circuitos Integrados de Aplicação Específica, em inglês Application Specific Integrated Circuits), hardwares específicos para mineração. Há uma lista na Bitcoin Wiki, em inglês, onde estão listados todos os ASICs disponíveis no mercado e também placas gráficas e processadores. É importante notar que embora seja possível minerar bitcoins, não é algo recomendado aos brasileiros, uma vez que o equipamento é caro, importado e possui taxas de importação - além da energia elétrica brasileira, que inviabiliza totalmente o processo.
Nota: Em processo de desenvolvimento: Guardando seus bitcoins e Ganhando bitcoins.

Unidades comuns do bitcoin

Unidade Abreviação Quantidade em bitcoin Uso Nome alternativo
Bitcoin BTC 1,00000000 Unidade básica, usada no client padrão. XBT
millibit mBTC 0,00100000 Padrão em diversos serviços. -
bit μBTC 0,00000100 Possível novo padrão a ser adotado. microbit
Satoshi - 0.00000001 Frequentemente usado para negociar altcoins, menor unidade possível. -

Comunidade brasileira

submitted by felipelalli to oBitcoin [link] [comments]

Why not BitCoin, ByteCoin, KiloBTC, MegaBTC, GigaBTC, TerraBTC, PetaBTC?

EDIT 2: I guess with 8 negative downvotes this community just isn't catching what I'm throwing and just wants to see themselves get rich. Satoshi would have, because I understand him, the same way. He created something I thought of when I first learned about the corruption of fractional reserve banking and c++ at the same time. Just glad he actually coded it.
It only seems natural that we would use these terms. Why did we make it so convoluted and complicated in the first place? It seems like we like the same way of using the metric system. I don't see why unless Bitcoin really was created for drug transactions, then I guess it makes sense to get a microbit for a microgram of LSD...
But this currency is based on technology, not on drugs. Why not kill two birds with one stone and start teaching the system of measurement we use in DATA alongside what we use in the metric system/drug trade?
The second benefit of this is...
1 PetaBit? (I like that) could possibly be worth the TOP denomination that may ever happen. Perhaps that means you bought in at an equivalent of 1,000 Bitcoin in the beginning once deflation rates and everything stabilize and now it's worth 1,000,000,000 bitcoin. In other words, the people that have made all this money have PetaBits of coin. NOT a SINGLE ONE. I feel we went backwards by going to a SMALLER unit, we needed to change the exchange rate in the OTHER direction to make the purchasing of A BITCOIN actually the same as it was. We're all lying saying we "split the stock" or whatever in all honesty, we're lying trying to bring people in to make ourselves richer. If we would have changed the term Bitcoin to GigaBTC, then that means anybody who got in early just got a HUGE dividend. This allows people to actually buy in for the same amount we did in the beginning. They aren't stupid. The media is still talking about how we hit GOLD parity for a single bitcoin. People aren't going to forget that and think "oh, I can buy 100 mBTC now for the same price THEY bought a Bitcoin, YAY!"
I'm not sure who we're kidding telling ourselves measuring Bitcoin smaller every time it goes up is a good idea. It's just the people already holding should get a new classification and let the people still buying in, get a hell of a good deal on the original unit of measure.
Psychology thing, I guess. Feel free to comment and vote to let me know what your opinion is on my way of seeing things. I'm here to learn just as much as the next person! :)
As a side note, it also EVENTUALLY forces the smallest amount to be the BITcoin... just like the smallest measure of data. What a wonderful coincidence and easy concept to grasp if you are already IT savvy in the least. :)
EDIT: We'd have to go to ExaBTC because of the 8 digit system we've built. (0.00000001 is a Satoshi currently)
submitted by SagefulSolutions to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin: A BIT of a problem

My name is Joe Average. I am the 80% of people who found out about bitcoin. I found out last week that an ATM for a new type of special currency is being released in my hometown, Vancouver BC Canada. Like many others, I'm still clueless about bitcoin, despite spending my halloween weekend researching it, trying to find out whether it's a trick or a treat (sorry I had to).
In this post, I'll list what I know about it, then list the thoughts, problems, and barriers that I, and probably 80% of the population, feel about bitcoin. These things are probably most relevant to those of you bitcoin enthusiast that have a vested interest in the success of the currency/commodity, because the general public represents a population that will influence the capacity that bitcoin can have in society.
Bitcoin has many advantages. Here are the advantages that I came across in forums and news articles: -free from government influence -zero bank fees -limited resource, naturally appreciating value -relatively anonymous -intangible, convenient to carry -irreversible transactions
And here are some problems, starting from the most relevant one which probably everyone thinks of right off the bat:
1-Bitcoin or cash? Why should I bother using bitcoin? Dozens of local merchants in my area are accepting bitcoin. Wow that's great! Now I can spend 2 hours acquiring bitcoin from a private, ungoverned, unregulated exchange (more on that later) and buy a medium belgium hot chocolate from waves (great drink by the way). Paying with card or cash? No ma'am, I'm paying with BITCOIN big teethy smile, eyebrows up and down several times Ok, bust out the ipad or whatever, spend 15 minutes waiting for the cashier to grab her ipad, unlock the screen, get a network connection at coffee shop network speeds, tap the bitpay app or w/e, load the app, scan my qr code, wait for the transaction to verify, blah blah blah, meanwhile, big ass line up forms behind me and I'm the big asshole who decided to pay with bitcoin instead of cash.
Okay, in all fairness, I'm probably being ignorant to some bitcoin app out there that cuts this whole process down from 15 minutes to just 5 minutes, the time it takes to verify transactions. But if I have to use an app, that probably costs money. So now my $4.50 dark belgium hot chocolate now costs $4.65 + 5 minutes of my life.
Hmm maybe I'll just 1) whip out some cash 2) whip out my visa card and pay it off right away so I don't incur interest fees 3) pay for it with debit, my bank doesn't charge me debit fees for using my card
2-Sending bitcoin So let's say what appeals to me is that bitcoin replaces Western Union, bank transfers, etcetc. I want to send $4,000 to Alice and Bob of ABC Co., payment for their work as hypothetical people in every accounting example I've ever read. For that amount, I'd have to pay >$100 in service fees from a money company. Or I could save myself >$100 by using bitcoin instead.
Okay great! Where do I start? Download a wallet. Done, nice. Next step, synchonize 208 weeks of ledger. Great.. oh, hang on. It's been 4 hours and I've downloaded 3 weeks. What the fuck?! How long does this take.. it doesn't even tell me how long it will take or how big the file is! computer left running overnight Awesome, just 2 more nights to go then I'll be fully syncrhonized. 2 days later hard-drive is maxed out? I needed a new one anyways. 4 days and a 500GB SSD later Now I have my wallet ready to use. Time to purchase some bitcoin!
So I purchase bitcoin, send it to Bob and Alice, and since they own ABC Co., a massive enterprise, they employ an IT guy, and he is the only guy in the company who will ever understand how to securely use bitcoin. He's behind 2 juniper firewalls (for redundancy), we VPN tunnel'd the payment code over with the pass, that way I know it went to him and nothing's been compromised. Because once the funds are sent out, it's gone, there is no insurance. Which brings me to my next point:
Bottom line: requires a lot of time to SAFELY and SECURELY send bitcoin, FEE-FREE. But that's okay because I have nothing better to do. If I had kids, errands, work, non-IT hobbies to do, $40-$100 might be worth the time it takes me to research the process of sending bitcoin out properly.
3-Bitcoin wallet services There's a whole list of companies emerging to take podium position in the race of the bitcoin wallet services world. Besides setting up a bitcoin exchange (which anyone can do in their basement), bitcoin wallets are the next biggest thing in bitcoin.
In the digital world, about 3 companies take podium position in a certain thing. Like Android/Apple/Blackberry for cell phones, Windows/Apple/Linux, Chrome/Firefox/IE, etc etc. Right now, for digital bitcoin wallets, everyone's competing to be one of those 3 major companies that everyone will use. Companies like coinbase.
These companies cost money. Coinbase has a pretty impressive talent pool. Let me introduce them to you:
Barry Kwok- Holy shit, this guy has a Masters in Engineering?! No seriously, this guy is a master of engineering. He built teams of 5 to 50 people at Google (fucking google man!). This guy is the first guy on the list, how much does he make? I'd have to guess $120k
Craig Hammell- This guy built OK Cupid. I know a guy who uses that shit to get laid, it really works, so OK cupid is probably a well-established company. Because of Craig's success with OK cupid, and the fact he looks that young, I'd say he probably doesn't make that much, just a modest $90k
Olaf Carlson-Wee- Olaf does rock-climbing, enough said. $95k
Fred Erhsam- Traded at Goldman Sachs. $150k
Charlie Lee- Invented Litecoin, worked on google chrome, google play, and youtube. $120k
Brian Armstrong- This guy has experience with Fraud Prevention. Don't know why they hired him, because as everyone's been saying, you can't fraud bitcoin. Since they don't need him, he's probably an intern.
Let's run some quick numbers: Total cost of salaries: $575,000/year Other expenses including dividends to investors: $3m/year
So this company has $3.6m a year to allocate to their consumer base of 329k of wallets, and 12k merchants. That is roughly $10.56/year per wallet or merchant. (realistically, the portion of cost between wallets and merchants would be not be split equally, and of course all these figures are pulled straight from thin air, however, this is reddit, not forbes).
That is a very low amount compared to using VISA which costs merchants $0.25/transaction+monthly service fee. As we can see, bitcoin is a great! Save some money.
But here's the problem: people fraud banks all the time. That costs money. Somebody puts $10k in their digital wallet, loses it, they're going to be pissed off. They'll start demanding it back from coinbase. The day coinbase pays 1 guy $10k compensation, the day they'll have to pay everyone that loses money like that, and that $3-mil figure I gave above will be much higher, and the fees everyone has to pay will go up. If coinbase doesn't compensate, then people will be reluctant to use bitcoin for anything other than small transactions.
This means bitcoin will not have the capacity to be adopted by regular people, like me. Either I lose big chunks of money at a time, when my digital wallet gets hacked, goes missing, frauded, etc, or I lose it in smaller chunks and frequency which is similar to a bank.
So digital wallet services are just like banks. Wait, I thought the bitcoin guys were saying banks were a bad thing?
4-Inflation vs Deflation I see a lot of bitcoin enthusiasts talking economics, which really angers me. You should read some of the things they say "inflation is bad, bitcoin actually deflates, so its good" "the government can't fuck with bitcoin, so its good" "bitcoin good, so it's good". If you're a bitcoin enthusiast and discussed bitcoin economics, you probably need to trade your internet credit for some college credits. Because seriously, that is some retarded shit. For example:
Inflation is bad, bitcoin deflates = good / The gov't can't fuck with bitcoin so it's good No. Inflation is good, yes I said it and you can quote me on that. Inflation allows job creation through lowering interest rates which encourages people and businesses to buy things. When stuff is bought, things happen. And jobs are required to make things happen. So when the government sees that "hey, our economy ain't doin too well, how bout we print some of ye ol' fashioned paper dolla bills" that's a strategic move to lower the unemployment rate and increase GDP.
The US is in shambles right now for reasons beyond inflation. The #1 reason why is labour costs too much in the US. Shaquila and Billy Bob don't want to work in a factory for $12/hr, they're too in love with hollywood and liberty, thinking they're entitled to a high paying comfortable job. Half of America thinks like that. But guess what, the Chinese don't, they're happy to pick up where Shaquila and Billy Bob left off. And because of the economies of scale thanks to their large population, that ignited over night, and now the US is left with a population that doesn't want to work. There's also a bunch of other reasons like going to war, etc, but that's debatable because there's a cost/benefit of going to war (own all the oil rigs out east to pay for things because you lazy fucks can't be bothered to make money with elbow grease).
The point is, mind fuck #1, inflation is a solution to a problem that's not related to money.
On the other side of the coin, deflation IS a bad thing.
Deflation, which bitcoin is designed to do, means that there will be fewer amounts of money to spend over time. That increases the price of things. That's good for people who are holding on to bitcoin. This encourages people to spend with bitcoin less, and save more. Mind fuck #2, saving money is bad, because it reduces GDP. It reduces the need for companies like coinbase to develop and create a product for spending bitcoin in the first place. So the more bitcoin deflates, the more its value goes up, the less people spend bitcoin on shit, the less merchants see a point in accepting bitcoin, the less merchants use bitcoin, the less people buy bitcoin, then bitcoins value goes down.
5-Limited supply of bitcoins This title should read Diminishing supply of bitcoins, but it would then be misinterpreted without an explanation. Bitcoins don't diminish, they are simply unaccounted for. Meaning, if you have bitcoins, and forget the password, it is gone forever. And in case you didn't know, people are human, making them prone to mistakes. Forgetting, etc. So, over time, enough people will lose bits and pieces of bitcoin here and there. That's going to add up over the long run. Units of measure will start going to miliBits, Microbits, ultra micro bits, ultra ultra micro bits. etc. Kind of like fiat currency, it can inflate to be infinitely large, and with bitcoin, infinitely smaller.
6-Exchanges and trading When Silk Road went down, bitcoin went up. First, naturally and by way of economics, fewer bitcoin = increased value. The Silk Road guy had $26-million USD worth of bitcoin, more than enough bitcoin to raise the market price. Followed by that, we have news, and hype, which drove higher. Then the fact prices are going up, makes a nice news article, which drives it up even more. When prices went up because of the news, incentive went up. Now the prices are so high, some people have made fortunes off of it. And that makes the news too, which drives it up again even higher.
That's a great incentive if you're a bitcoin investor. Hey, the winklevoss twins have 1% of bitcoin, all you miners go use your mining pools to break into the winklevoss account and delete the fuck out of their bitcoin wallets and backup, so you can raise the market value.
Just kidding. That's a lot of work. You know what's easier? This:
1) Start your own bitcoin exchange, no fees 100% free. 2) People will start trading on it. 3) ???? 4) Profit!
Actually step 3 isn't a mystery, you set the fucking price level to whatever you want it to be. And because it's 100% unregulated, unsanctioned, not tied to any commodities, no authority, no referee, no consortium, you can do whatever the fuck you want on it.
Without authority, believing that the prices on the bitcoin exchange is set naturally by way of price and demand is like believing in religion. You just have to believe.
Of course with public exchanges, there is some level of corruption involved, but that's why people get arrested and shit. Using bitcoin exchanges doesn't have that level of protection, and it never will. You think the governments own law enforcement is going to go after guys corrupting a private stock exchange, which trades a currency that negatively impacts their own fiat currency? Unless the government is somehow benefiting from bitcoin, which it won't by design, the police will simply have a good laugh at that.
In conclusion, there's so many flaws that I can see with bitcoin. But bitcoin enthusiasts will say otherwise. If I jumped on the bitcoin train 3 years ago, I'd probably do the same thing as you: make up some backwards economic reasoning it'll succeed, some backward political reason, etc.
So Dear Bitcoin, you just don't make enough sense to us, the general population, for us to adopt you. A great substitute for currency in the underground world, but you just don't fit with us here on the mainstream. And if you did fit, you'll end up being regulated just like currency, so what's the point? You're the same shit as my cash or cards. Fuck off. -Joe Average
submitted by smoothboi69 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

No to scientific names; Yes to ringos and toras!

I really don't think we should be naming currencies scientific names -- milibits, embits, or what not. Naming coins is really an important part in making people feel comfortable with a currency.
With milbits or microbits you always are being told that you have part of something -- you do not have a full coin perse. Everyone is familiar with millimeters. Who wants to have a millimeter worth of something.
If you use something like ringos or toras though everyone will no how they relate to each other just like everyone knows how many dimes are in a dollar. But it will be something that rolls off the tongue easily and that can function by itself if bitcoins become to expensive to use in everyday life.
What would you rather say? I'm the proud owner of 5 milibits? Or I'm the proud owner of 5 ringos? or 5 toras? (all the while knowing the fixed relationship of toras to ringos to bitcoin)?
Scientific names might sound nice at first but in the end they sound way too scientific, clumsy to use, and pedantic. If bitcoin is really the way of the future, I don't want to be giving to my children milibits and microbits but toras and ringos.
I'm not too attached to ringos or toras. . I'm curious if there are other ideas for beautiful (non-scientific names).
Perhaps one way to arrive at a consensus would be for coinbase and other exchanges to allow denomination in a bunch of different equivalent terms -- with options like ringos (m B) toras (mB), embits (mB) or dragoons (mB). If they keep track of what the dominant trends are we could start considering those terms more standard terminology.
submitted by BalconySitter to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A case for the microbitcoin (uBTC) satobitcoin (sBTC).

Everyday, there are dozens of post being made about how we need to stop referring to whole Bitcoins and begin using the millibitcoin (mBTC) or microbitcoin (uBTC) as the new standard denomination. Within all of these discussions, you generally have a handful of people advising that we skip past all of them and go straight into using the Satoshi as the new standard unit.
Right now, we are on the verge of the millibitcoin reaching parity with the US Dollar. While this will be unquestionably convenient for BTC accepting merchants, the fact remains that at this point, barely any of these merchants are pegging their prices to the Bitcoin, but are instead using USD, EUR, etc and letting the payment processor do the conversion based on the current exchange rate. Therefore, by this logic, it makes little difference what the merchants decide, since they are most likely using Bitcoin has a cheap form of payment processing.
The question we should all be asking ourselves is how high do we expect the Bitcoin market cap to climb, before we reach a point of stability, and how long do we anticipate it will take for us to get there. The honest truth is, that none of us can definitively answer this. However, let's assume that Bitcoin has enough growing room to achieve a $100B market cap by sometime in the year 2015. At this point, one Bitcoin will be valued at approximately $6,666.67 USD, which would mean that the millibitcoin will have reached $6.67, whereas the microbit will have yet to reach parity with the US cent. Now, if you are looking at this from an American mindset, you are probably thinking, "Gee! mBTC's are awesome! The market will have to increase another ten fold before we will even need to start considering using anything else." The honest truth is that you are probably right. However, we Americans usually have a hard time accounting the fact that we only make up about 5% of the World's population. Let's see how the uBTC stacks up to a few currencies that are within markets that have potential to deliver serious growth to the Bitcoin economy.
At a $100B USD Marketcap (current exchange rates) 1 uBTC would be the equivalent to
.09 Mexican Pesos
.02 Brazilian Reals
.42 Indian Rupees
.02 Israeli New Shequel
.58 Kenyan Shillings
As you can see, compared to other global currencies, the uBTC does not seem nearly as small as it does for us in the US. Now, let's take this to an extreme hypothetical. Let's assume that one day Bitcoin reaches a total market cap of $1 Trillion USD. At this point, the uBTC will be knocking on nearly a .07 USD valuation, and will have surpassed parity of some of the currencies listed above.
So what is the right answer? Truth is, there isn't one. The preferred choice of BTC denominations should be a regional decision, and not a global one. I do know that while a $1 Trillion market cap is within the realm of possibility, I do not see it happening by 2015, then again, I could be incredibly wrong. What does need to happen I believe is that developers need to design their products and services, such as wallets and exchanges to be as modular as possible for each individual user, and possibly set the defaults based on wherever the service or application is being used.
Furthermore, you'll notice that I referred to the Satoshi as a satobitcoin (sBTC). Why? Well, let's be real. Does anyone honestly think that a "satoshi" is going to be widely accepted around the globe if Bitcoin grows to the level that we are all hoping that it does. My money is on no. It's a nice gesture, but I just cannot see it being widely adopted in the long run. Nanobitcoins have a nice ring to them, but that would require Bitcoins to be broken down to the ninth decimal place, rather than the eighth that Satoshi originally intended. I personally think that the "satobit" has a much better sounding ring to it, is much less jarring and still pays tribute to Bitcoin's originator.
Bitcoin, centibitcoin, millibitcoin, microbitcoin, satobitcoin
submitted by brcreeker to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Microbit donation to VideoLAN. Micro transaction with bitcoin. QR scanner. Mycelium wallet. What's the Best Bitcoin Exchange!? BITBOT app trick revealed for FREEbitcoin that you never know How to buy bitcoin and cryptocurrency using exchange?';;';';';'.;.;/'?'? Official TBC to BITCOIN Exchange Leaked

The MicroBitcoin is a Proof of Work (PoW) algorithm that anyone can mine through node participation. For information on how to install the node, refer to the node installation guide:[Link to guide] At block height 1,137,200. Estimated to occur on October 9, 2019 11:00 (UTC+0). Power2b Proof-of-Work Algorithm. The Bitcoin increased by 2.85% on Thursday 4th of June 2020. Let's take a look at interesting data from yesterday. Min. Bitcoin value was $9,547.80. Max. BTC price was $9,827.83. The average value Bitcoin price for convert (or exchange rate) during the day was $9,684.37. BTC price increased by 2.85% between min. and max. value. The Bitcoin dropped by 2.79% on Tuesday 26th of May 2020. How was the currency exchange rate changed on yesterday? BTC price dropped by 2.79% between min. and max. value. The average value Bitcoin price for convert (or exchange rate) during the day was $8,878.68. Min. Bitcoin value was $8,734.02. Max. BTC price was $8,977.95. Micro Bitcoin (MBC) aims to encourage micro-payments for Bitcoin holders by providing a secure and sustainable open source community and ecosystem of users, developers, and miners by means of a hardfork of the Bitcoin blockchain.

[index] [1374] [12151] [18020] [30977] [1839] [24413] [8409] [21080] [21759] [741]

Microbit donation to VideoLAN. Micro transaction with bitcoin. QR scanner. Mycelium wallet.

How To Exchange Your TBC to BITCOIN 2019 - Duration: 7:13. Blue Techs 12,051 views. 7:13. How To Speak by Patrick Winston - Duration: 1:03:43. MIT OpenCourseWare Recommended for you. What is the best exchange to buy Bitcoin at? This can be a difficult question, especially for people new to Bitcoin. In the video I go over the most popular exchanges, (USA), and give pros and ... #bitcoin #crypto #cryptocurrencies In this video I give my top 5 exchanges for buying Bitcoin & general cryptocurrencies! These exchanges are aimed at beginner to intermediate level people in the ... JOIN EXCHANGE FOR TRADING Click the link for binance https://accounts.binance.com/en/regis... 24/7 Live Bitcoin Algo Trading on Deribit Exchange (DeriBot) Bitcoin Trading Robots 154 watching Live now Don't use Coinbase, use GDAX instead to ELIMINATE FEES!

Flag Counter