Bitcoin Wallet For Zappos

Zappos with bitcoin! Be ready for rise of Bitcoin price!

Zappos with bitcoin! Be ready for rise of Bitcoin price! submitted by OhMyCoin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Zappos 2014 Bitcoin Announcement Stupid April fool's joke

Zappos 2014 Bitcoin Announcement Stupid April fool's joke submitted by wolfofbitcoin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Zappos 2014 Bitcoin Announcement

Zappos 2014 Bitcoin Announcement submitted by uberazzi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Zappos=decentralization=holacracy, then why doesn't Zappos use bitcoin?

Seems like bitcoin corresponds with the decentralized efforts Zappos is experimenting with. Why not go all out and accept bitcoin Tony Hsieh? It's a teal llama thing to do.
submitted by Playful12 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Zappos=decentralization=holacracy, then why doesn't Zappos use bitcoin? /r/Bitcoin

Zappos=decentralization=holacracy, then why doesn't Zappos use bitcoin? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Zappos.com’s April Fools’ Day Joke: All Refunds To Be Issued in Bitcoin

Zappos.com’s April Fools’ Day Joke: All Refunds To Be Issued in Bitcoin submitted by HDSeed to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

April 1st: Zappos! CEO Tony Hsieh Announces Bitcoin Refunds In Honor Of Satoshi

April 1st: Zappos! CEO Tony Hsieh Announces Bitcoin Refunds In Honor Of Satoshi submitted by bitbybitbybitcoin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Zappos.com’s April Fools’ Day Joke: All Refunds To Be Issued in Bitcoin

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How To Gain From Bitcoin Investment

How To Gain From Bitcoin Investment
Bitcoin (or BTC for short) is a computerized money and shared installment framework made by the pseudonymous programming engineer Satoshi Nakamoto. Despite the fact that initially obscure to the overall population, Bitcoin has as of late pulled in bunches of consideration in the budgetary world throughout the last not many years.[1] With this far reaching consideration, the way toward putting resources into Bitcoin has as of late become simpler than at any other time. In any case, it's critical to take note of that Bitcoin isn't a standard venture (like, for example, stock) — it's progressively similar to an amazingly flimsy item, so don't purchase before you comprehend the dangers.

Purchasing and Selling BTC

Make a Bitcoin wallet. Today, purchasing and selling Bitcoin is simpler for novices than at any other time. As your initial step, you'll need to pursue something many refer to as a Bitcoin wallet. Like its name proposes, your wallet is a computerized account that makes it genuinely simple and advantageous to purchase, store, and sell your Bitcoin — consider it like an all inclusive Bitcoin financial records. Dissimilar to a financial records, be that as it may, beginning a Bitcoin wallet generally takes not exactly a moment, should be possible on the web, and is very simple.

Locales like Coinbase.com, Coinmkt.com, Blockchain.info and Hivewallet.com are only a couple of instances of trustworthy, solid and easy to understand destinations for apprentices to make their first wallet.

Connection your ledger to your wallet. When you have a wallet, it's an ideal opportunity to fill it with Bitcoin. Ordinarily, to do this, you'll have to supply the budgetary subtleties for a certifiable financial balance simply like you would on the off chance that you were setting up a PayPal record or pursuing another online installment administration. Generally, you'll need in any event your financial balance number, the directing number for the record, and your complete name as it shows up on the record. You can quite often discover these on your web based financial record or on your paper checks.[2]

Note that you may likewise be approached to give contact data, similar to a telephone number.

All things considered, connecting your financial balance to your Bitcoin wallet isn't anything else of a hazard to your own security than it is to shop on the web. Essentially all respectable Bitcoin administrations try to publicize their exclusive requirements for security and encryption. While Bitcoin administrations have been focused by programmers previously, so too have many major online retailers.

https://preview.redd.it/2a8y8tug00j41.jpg?width=660&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=f53064247c8ef8075a04c3102099fb438cc5238f
Purchase BTC with cash from your financial balance. When you've provided your bank data and it's been checked by the Bitcoin administration, it ought to be genuinely simple to begin buying BTC and adding it to your wallet. As a rule, on your wallet page, there ought to be an alternative named "Purchase Bitcoin" or something comparable — clicking this should take you through a clear exchange process that utilizes cash from your financial balance to buy BTC.

Note that the cost of Bitcoin can (and does) change from everyday — in some cases altogether. Since Bitcoin is a generally new type of cash, its market presently can't seem to get steady. The present dollar-to-BTC swapping scale ought to be unmistakably recorded when you get it — as of October 2014, 1 BTC was equivalent to about $350.

Utilize your Bitcoin to purchase from retailers that acknowledge it. As of late, an expanding number of organizations have started to acknowledge Bitcoin as a legitimate type of installment. Despite the fact that these organizations despite everything speak to a minority, some significant names have just made the change. The following is only a short rundown of online sellers that acknowledge BTC:

Amazon

Wordpress

Overstock.com

Bitcoin.travel

Victoria's Secret

Tram

Zappos

Entire Foods

In case you're advertise adroit (or fortunate), you can possibly create an incentive for yourself thusly by purchasing Bitcoin when its cost is low, at that point buying merchandise when the estimation of Bitcoin is high to get an ideal arrangement on the products. You would then be able to offer these products to make a benefit or essentially keep them.
submitted by Bitcoin12investment to u/Bitcoin12investment [link] [comments]

Apps Updated for iPhone X Resolution

Just wanted to start a place where we can accumulate all of the known Apps that have been updated for the new iPhone X resolution. I don't know how well it will work, but my goal is to keep this main post updated with the Apps provided in the comments. I was validating each of them, but due to the number and struggle to keep up, I’m just taking new submissions for what they are (name and all). Help others by listing the full app name found in the App Store.
 
Here's the current alphabetized list:
submitted by 8842imj to apple [link] [comments]

[Reference] Here's a raw list of ~300 retailers that accept BCH via Gyft & eGifter. It's fun to spendl both online & in your neighborhood!

Confused? Scroll to bottom.
Gyft.com:
1-800-Baskets.com 1-800-Flowers.com 1-800-PetSupplies.com Adidas Aerie Aeropostale Allposters.com AMC Theatres American Airlines American Eagle American Frame App Store & iTunes Applebee's Aquarium Restaurants Art.com Athleta Babin's Seafood House Bahama Breeze Banana Republic Barnes & Noble Bass Pro Shops Bath & Body Works Bed Bath & Beyond® Belk Best Buy® Big Fish Seafood Bistro Bloomingdale's Boomerang Grille Brenner's Steakhouse Brinker Restaurants Brookstone Bubba Gump Shrimp Buca di Beppo Buffalo Wild Wings Build-A-Bear Workshop Burger King Burlington buybuy BABY® Cabela's Cadillac Bar California Pizza Kitchen Callaway CanvasPop Captain D's Caribou Coffee Casual Male XL Catherines CB2 Champs Sports CharityChoice Charleston's Restaurant Charley's Crab Chart House Chef'd Cheryl's Cookies Chili's Chipotle Christmas Tree Shops® andThat! Claim Jumper Cold Stone Creamery Columbia Sportswear Cost Plus World Market Crate & Barrel Crutchfield D'Angelo Darden Restaurants Dell Delta Air Lines Destination XL Domino's Dunkin' Donuts eBay EXPRESS Fandango Fish Tales Fisherman's Wharf Foot Locker FragranceNet.com Fruit Bouquet GameStop Gap Factory Gap Gilt.com Go Play Golf by Fairway Rewards Golden Nugget Google Play Great American Days Grotto Groupon Hal Smith Restaurant Hallmark Harlow's Food & Fun Hefner Grill Hollie's Flatiron Steakhouse Hollister HomeGoods Hot Topic Hotels.com Hulu IHOP JCPenney Jo-Ann Stores Kemah Boardwalk Kmart Kohl's L.L.Bean La Griglia Lady Foot Locker Landry's Landry's Seafood Lands' End Lane Bryant Legal Sea Foods Levy Restaurants Lighthouse Buffet Lobster Gram Logan's Roadhouse LongHorn Steakhouse Lord and Taylor Louie's Grill & Bar Lowe's Lucille's BBQ Macy's Magazines.com Maggiano's Little Italy Mahogany Steakhouse Mama Roja Kitchen Marshalls McCormick & Schmicks Microsoft Office 365 Home, 1-year subscription Microsoft Office 365 Personal, 1-year subscription Mitchell's Fish Market Morton's Muer Seafood NASCAR.com NFLShop.com Nike Nintendo Nordstrom Nordstrom Rack Old Navy Olive Garden Omaha Steaks On The Border One Kings Lane Overstock.com Panera Bread Papa Gino's Papa John's Pizza Peohe's Petco Pro Am Golf Rainforest Cafe Red Lobster Red Robin Red Sushi Redrock Canyon Grill Regal Cinemas River Crab/BlueWater Inn Rixty Rochester Big & Tall Romano's Macaroni Grill Rosetta Stone TOTALe Royal Caribbean Saks OFF 5TH Saltgrass Steak House San Jose Earthquakes San Luis Resort Sears Sephora Sheetz Shutterfly Simms Steakhouse SiriusXM Southwest Airlines Spa & Wellness by Spa Week SpaFinder Staples Starbucks Steak 'n Shake Stein Mart Steiner Sports Memorabilia StubHub T-Rex T.J.Maxx Target GiftCard TGI Fridays The Cheesecake Factory The Children's Place The Crab House The Flying Dutchman The Garage The Home Depot® The Oceanaire The Popcorn Factory The Red Door Salon & Spa ThinkGeek Toby Keith's Bar & Grill Tony Roma's Torrid Tower of America Uber - INCLUDING Uber Eats (food delivery from your local takeout restaurants!) Ulta Beauty Under Armour® Unleashed by Petco Uno Chicago Grill Upper Crust Pizza Vic and Anthony's Victoria's Secret Walmart Whole Foods Market Willie G's Wine Country Gift Basket Wine Enthusiast Wine.com Xbox LIVE Yak & Yeti Yard House Zappos.com 
eGifter.com
1-800-Flowers.com Abercrombie & Fitch Acorns Adidas Aerie Aeropostale Alamo Drafthouse AllPosters.com Amazon.com AMC Theaters Amella Caramels American Airlines American Eagle Outfitters American Frame Applebee's Aquarium Restaurants Athleta Babin's Seafood House babyGap Bahama Breeze Banana Republic Bar Toma Barnes & Noble Booksellers Bass Pro Shops Bath & Body Works Bed Bath & Beyond Belk Best Buy® Big Fish Restaurant BJs Restaurants Black Angus Steakhouse Bloomin' Brands Bloomingdale's Bonefish Grill Boscov's Boston Market Boxed Brenner's Steakhouse Bridge Bar Brookstone Bubba Gump Buffalo Wild Wings Build-A-Bear Burger King Burlington Coat Factory buybuy Baby Cabela's Cadillac Bar Cafe Spiaggia California Pizza Kitchen Callaway CanvasPop Captain D's Captain Morgan Club Caribou Coffee Carnival Cruise Lines Carrabbas Italian Grill Casual Male Celebrity Cruises Champs Sports Charity Choice Charleston's Restaurant Charley's Crab Chart House Restaurant Chef'D Children's Music Shop Chili's Chipotle Christmas Tree Shops Cirque du Soleil Claim Jumper Cold Stone Creamery Columbia Sportswear CrossFire Crutchfield CVS/pharmacy D'Angelo Darden Dell Delta Airlines Destination Maternity Destination XL Domino's Pizza Downtown Aquarium Dunkin' Donuts Ebay Express Facebook Game Card Fandango Fish Tales Fisherman's Wharf Fleming's Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar Foot Locker FragranceNet.com Fulton’s Crab House Fulton’s on the River GameStop Gap Gap Options GCodes® AT&T Prepaid Plans GCodes® Verizon Prepaid Plans Gilt Go Play Golf GoCash GolfThere Googie Burger Great American Days Grotto Groupon Guitar Center Gymboree Hal Smith Restaurant Group Harlow's Hefner Grill Hollie’s Flatiron Steakhouse Hollister HomeGoods HOOCHs Hot Topic Hotels.com Hulu IHOP IMVU IndieFlix iTunes JAGEX Jake Melnick's Corner Tap JCPenney Jiffy Lube Jo-Ann Fabric JumpStart School of Dragons Karma Koin Kemah Boardwalk Kingsisle Pirate Kingsisle Wizard Kmart Kohl's Krispy Kreme La Griglia Landry's Landry's Seafood Lands' End Lane Bryant Legal Sea Foods Lobster Gram Logan's Roadhouse Longhorn Steakhouse Lord & Taylor Louie's Grill & Bar Lowe's Lucille's Smokehouse BBQ Macy's Magazines.com Maggiano's Little Italy Mahogany Prime Steakhouse Mama Roja Mexican Kitchen Marshalls McCormick & Schmick's Microsoft Office 365 Home Microsoft Office 365 Personal MobileLocate Morton's The Steakhouse Muer Seafood Restaurants NASCAR.com Superstore Neopets NetDragon Universal Nike Nintendo eShop Digital Cards Nordstrom Nordstrom Rack O'Charley's Oak Street Beach Food + Drink Old Navy Olive Garden Omaha Steaks On the Border Mexican Grill & Cantina Outback Steakhouse Overstock.com P.C. Richard and Son Panera Bread Papa Gino's Pizzeria Papa John's Peohe's Petco PetSupplies.com Portobello Princess Cruises ProAm Golf Rainforest Cafe ReallyColor Red Lobster Red Robin Red Sushi Redrock Canyon Grill Regal Entertainment Group REI Rixty ROBLOX Rochester Big & Tall Ruby Tuesday Saks OFF 5th Saltgrass Sears Sephora Sheetz Shutterfly Simms Steakhouse Simply Magazine Sirius XM Skype Sling TV Sony Playstation Southwest Airlines Spa and Wellness by Spa Week Spa Finder Spiaggia Stage Stores Staples Steak 'n Shake Stein Mart Steiner Sports Memorabilia Stitch Fix Stockpile StubHub Studio Movie Grill Swap.com T-Rex T.J.Maxx Target Texas Roadhouse TGI Fridays The Cheesecake Factory The Children's Place The Crab House The Flying Dutchman The Garage The Home Depot The Oceanaire ThinkGeek Toby Keith's I Love This Bar & Grill Tony Roma's Torrid Tower of the Americas Tracer Pix Uber - INCLUDING Uber Eats (food delivery from your local takeout restaurants!) Ulta Unlimited eBooks Uno Upper Crust Wood Fired Pizza Vic & Anthony's Vimbly Walmart Wargaming World of Tanks Wargaming World of Warships Whole Foods Willie G's Wine Country Gift Baskets Wine Enthusiast Wine.com Wolfgang Puck Grand Cafe WWE Network XBOX Xbox Live Gold Yak and Yeti Yard House 
For those who don't know, Gyft.com & eGifter.com sell gift cards online (Amazon, iTunes, BedBathBeyond, etc., like you see in the revolving rack at the corner convenience store). Both services accept BitcoinCash (via Bitpay). Instead of a plastic card, they send you a "virtual" card (an activation code). So you can buy stuff from all the stores above with BCH (& then replace your BCH so you don't later feel like you spent $500 on diapers :)
I scraped and massaged the lists from both services for you because I find it easier to refer to than browsing their sites that make you scroll through logos instead.
Many of the retailers are found on both services. Many are unique to one. The superset is probably about 300 (plus thousands of local restaurants that participate with Uber Eats).
There's a lot more than Restaurants, Starbucks & Playstore! You'll find Uber, airlines (Southwest, American, Delta), Hotels.com, XBOX, Playstation, Dell, Microsoft Office, Hulu, Ebay, Wine.com, Walmart, Target, Home Depot, CVS Pharmacy, Marshalls, Panera, Nordstrom Rack, Nike, Adidas, Zappo, Foot Locker... You can literally live on BCH now (if only there were a way to pay utilities and rent/mortgage).
You can have a super smooth experience buying a card while queuing for the register. When you tap to pay in BitcoinCash (or BTC) from the Gyft app, android prompts you to launch your wallet! The amount, fee, and receiving address is already filled in. Simply take a look to confirm and then slide to pay. In seconds (before the next register is open) the new gift card is in your Gyft app "wallet" and ready to be scanned by the cashier. You can also regift/send the gift card to a friend instead of activating/revealing the card's code.
Note that Uber credit is how you pay for Uber Eats, so an Uber gift card can not only get you around town but also bring food to your door from restaurants in your neighborhood.
Feel free to paste the lists into the weekly/monthly or any BCH updates, or to categorize it (i should have but I don't know them all). It's not my data obviously. I don't know how often the two services update the lists.
(Not sure which are limited to regions. I can confirm that Uber gift card was credited when pasted in the Uber app, in Japan, but wasn't usable for rides in Japan. The balance was perfectly usable later, in USA.)
submitted by LuxuriousThrowAway to btc [link] [comments]

Lite Campaign - The push for adoption!

Litecoin needs adoption!
I think we, as a community, are able to achieve a lot more than we currently am. We can easily unite to push for Litecoin adoption on many platforms through social media, email, phone calls and other forms of contact. Litecoin is ready and has been ready for a long time. Now all we need is adoption and support from companies to use this spendable version of Bitcoin as a currency. Why would we wait any longer?
 
The Idea I suggest a weekly list of 5 companies along with their forms of contact. The idea is that Litecoin gets their attention. We contact them and suggest Litecoin as a new form of digital payment for their company.
 
Suggestions
if you have suggestions for this idea leave them in the comments. Also, if you have companies in mind you would like to see accept Litecoin let me know!
 

Lite Campaign - Week 1

Suggest Litecoin to these companies through the contact options below  
1 Company: www.Wish.com Phone: 1-800-266-0172 Twitter: https://twitter.com/WishShopping Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wish/ Email contact: [email protected] unsure if active
2 Company: www.Deezer.com Phone: - Twitter: https://twitter.com/Deezer or https://twitter.com/DeezerHelp Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Deeze Email contact: https://support.deezer.com/hc/en-gb/requests/new
3 Company: www.Netflix.com Phone: 0800-096-6380 Twitter: https://twitter.com/netflix https://twitter.com/Netflixhelps Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/netflix/ Email contact: https://media.netflix.com/en/contact-us Livechat: https://help.netflix.com/en#startChat
4 Company: www.zappos.com Phone: (800)927-7671 Twitter: https://twitter.com/Zappos Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/zappos/ Email contact: https://www.zappos.com/contact Livechat: https://www.zappos.com/tng/chat.zml
5 Company: www.Etsy.com Phone: https://www.etsy.com/help/article/4872 Twitter: https://twitter.com/Etsy or https://twitter.com/EtsyHelp Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Etsy/ Email contact: https://www.etsy.com/help/contact
submitted by amnesCx to litecoin [link] [comments]

Fall in love with the problem, not the solution.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with a writeup from Ahmad Iqbal.
Ahmad was one of the first people I interviewed at Starter Story for his bidet business. Now he's working on building Shopify apps and wrote this awesome post about his transition:
One of the best pieces of advice I was given was to Fall in love with the problem, not the solution. And it wasn’t until I came across a big problem that I realized how perfect this advice is.

My name is Ahmad Iqbal and I’m currently running two online businesses. I am both an Ecommerce Merchant as well as an Ecommerce App Developer.
The first of the two is my online store where I sell hand-held bidets. The later business, borne of the need to increase bidet sales, guided me to designing and developing apps for other merchants, like me.
In this post I want to illustrate how I made the leap from selling bidets online, to building an app design and development team. It’s strange for me to say it out loud, "how does one go from selling butt cleaning appliances to building and marketing apps?" So when Pat from Starter Story reached out to do a follow-up piece to my original post I was happy to try and put my experiences into words. Not just for others to read, but for myself in documenting my journey.
If the title hasn’t already given it away, this will be about my relationship with Problems.
I'm going to start at the middle (quiting my job) and then go to 2015 when this 'starter story' actually started, followed by the meat and potatos of the frameworks we use in our app development model.
My desk and kanban board

Quitting my Job & Making Money through Shopify Apps

From 2015 to 2017 I was working full-time at a global Big Four firm as a Senior Technology Consultant. My job was to help Fortune 1000 companies get their products to market faster. During my time growing my bidet store, I was starting to become more and more immersed in growth marketing. So much so, that I spun out a marketing framework I used for myself and called it the "Agile Marketing Framework" for the firm. Everything I was learning on my own time for growing my own business, was helping me be better for my big clients at my job. But even though doing well at work felt great, it was WAY more fun helping small businesses. In 2017 I had decided the world needs better small businesses, not bigger big businesses.
But in order to quit my job (my Nadeef bidet sales were taking a hit with my attention now diverted between my demanding full-time job, app design/development, and supporting Scout merchants) I needed to figure out if building apps on Shopify would be a viable business model. Was it even possible to earn a living selling apps full time?
It seemed like a tough proposition. I would need thousands of merchants paying at least $20/month to create a successful business. I didn’t think it would be possible, until I came across the Bold Commerce story. This four person team in Winnipeg, Manitoba, had almost the same story as us. Merchants first, identified gaps in the app store, and deciding to build apps on Shopify. Bold Commerce now employs almost 300 people, with no outside funding to date, and with their growth solely on the Shopify platform. This case study was enough to convince us to take the leap, I wanted us to be like Bold.
Having decided it was in fact possible to build positive cash flows through app subscriptions on Shopify, next thing we had to do was get our financing organized.
We decided to take three months to prepare and think about if this problem was something we wanted to dedicate the next several years of our lives to. This three month period was my time to save as much money as I could, and test my own conviction. This time was a constant decision making cycle, where I continually asked myself if the market was big enough, if the problem was widespread enough, and if I had the right pieces in place. It was an important lesson from my first startup attempt almost seven years earlier. In my first startup we picked the wrong market, at the wrong time, with no experience or resources, and the result was a four year uphill campaign that left us in pieces.
So before quitting my job, every dollar of income was saved, Bitcoins were cashed, plans to move out of my parent’s basement were halted, and I started creating a partner network across the ecommerce ecosystem.
We had enough to focus on building our apps for 36 months without worrying about money or raising venture capital. Today we’re on month 12 out of 36.

Let's Talk About the Failure First

Instead of jupming straight into Scout (the first app we built and the main subject of this post) let me first tell you about one of our apps that did not do well. Our "hand-written" notes app was attempted after the initial success of Scout, but it was a wake up call to stay focused on the problem, not the solution.
After quitting my job, and landing on the bigger problem of customer experience as our company mandate (more on this later), we decided to offer hand-written note services. We figured customers would love getting a handwritten note from merchants, so with little else research, or testing, we went ahead and started building out this crazy printer.
A video about how it worked
The app would connect to your Shopify backend, identify your VIP customers, and then convert that customer information into a special Adobe Illustrator script that would feed into the printer. The printer then would proceed to start writing the notes in a handwritten style font (both the letter copy and the addresses on the envelope).
We rolled this app out as an added skill to Scout. Basically, when Scout would alert you about the previous days’ VIP customers, it now offered an additional button labeled "Send Handwrote Card" which when pressed would instigate our printer. When the card was printed, I’d just have to put the postage stamp on it and drop it off at the post office which was across the street from our co-working space.
I believe this idea failed because I fell in love with the solution (cool looking robotic handwriting printer) rather than the problem it was designed to solve. I still believe there is value in this idea, but by overbuilding the solution first, we lost track of what was most important.
If I had to do it again I would have done a few things differently:
1. Manually write and fulfill the cards myself while doing the merchant discovery
Because there exists an intimate relationship between selling the service, and having to manually having to fulfill the service. It gives you more appreciation for the process and what’s important to do it successfully. Like with Scout, where I called my customers up manually through finding their details myself, and only after seeing how to do it well proceeded to systemize it with an app.
2. Personally talk to each merchant who wanted cards written
This would have been the best (only?) way to validate the value of the service. How important is this service for merchants? What else do they wish they could give as 'thank you's? What price would they be willing to pay on high volume handwritten cards? How much does it bother them that the cards are not personally written by the brand, and hence not authentic?
3. Write 0 lines of new code
Why divert precious development time and resources on something if A) it’s possible to do manually, and B) there is no guarantee that it’s a lucrative idea?
Thinking back, this idea was destined to fail for several reasons. Writing notes is very time consuming, there isn’t enough volume in the merchants who wanted to use it, the authenticity of the cards dies if customers figure out it’s not actually written by a person (even though it fooled almost anyone who looked at it). Even if we had done this the lean way and manually tested first, I still think we would have stopped offering the solution. But if I had just followed my four step Identify, Test, Build, Measure framework we would have saved the $4,000 we ended up spending designing and developing the software, and sourcing this printer and it’s parts. I would have found out in the Test section of the cycle that this is way too time consuming and merchants have too many questions about it to feel comfortable signing off on handwritten notes on high volume.
The handwritten note printer is now a piece of decoration at our office, but hey, at least it makes for a good conversation! And it taught me what I'm about to share with you today...

Identifying a Problem

Rewind back to 2015, a few months after opening my Nadeef hand-held bidet store on Shopify I found myself tackling the abandoned checkout problem, something every merchants probably faces. For every three potential customers that reached the final stage of checkout, one wasn’t pulling out their credit card. The way I saw it, I was leaking 33% of my sales in the final, most crucial, "moment of truth."
I was new to this field, I didn’t know the jargon or the best practices, all I knew was I needed to plug this hole. I went down a rabbit hole of recommendations, blog posts, forum threads, apps and YouTube videos. I tried many tactics, with varying degrees of "success" but later I realized I was asking myself the wrong question.
Instead of asking "How can I recovery these sales?" I should have been asking “Why are customer abandoning their checkout?”
At first I tried to extrapolate why they abandoned through the default go-to answers most blog posts claim are the reasons, like shipping timeframes, pricing, return policies, etc. But I knew these weren’t the real issues causing the abandoned cart because I would address them in my auto-recovery emails, exit-popups, Facebook retargeting campaigns, or all the other ways I would try to reduce abandons.
As simple as those recovery tactics may seem, I now know I was overthinking it. There was only one thing I could do to figure out why someone abandoned their checkout. Pick up the phone, and ask them one-on-one.
Before I go on, I should state that my recovery rate at this point was around 10%. And Shopify’s dashboard told me this was a good thing. I just didn’t think that was good at all. It meant that for every 10 people who reached the final stage of their checkout only one person actually returned to buy? Sure it's better than $0, but what about the other 90% who aren't returning? Surely we could do better than 1/10...
...and I wanted to talk to those nine people.
Calling my abandoned checkout customers changed everything. It changed my whole perspective about how to do business, and it continues to change it even now. At first, there was hesitation to call up a customer out of the blue, but the desire to figure out the problem far outweighed any "worst-case" awkward conversation. Not to mention, they weren’t cold leads, these were highly interested customer who reached the final steps of making a purchase. In my head I kept telling myself this was exactly as if someone walked into a store, grabbed some items, placed them on the checkout counter, but just as they were about to pull out their wallet, they turned around and walked out the door. Wouldn’t the store owner ask what’s up? So I just smiled and dialled.
The results were tremendous.
I went from recovering 10% of my abandoned checkouts from auto-emails, to recovering 55% when I got them on the phone. Not only that but by gathering feedback and identifying holes in my offering the percentage of abandons slowly decreased as well.
I’ve outlined my learnings from calling customers in this diagram

Creating a Solution

I saw my process was working, but now I needed to systemize it so I could maintain consistency in my callbacks. I quickly learned that the longer I waited to call the abandoned customer back the less likely I would be able to recover the sale. I really just needed an alert app, one that would push notify me as soon as someone abandoned, tell me what products they left, and their phone number. There was nothing in the app store that provided this function.
Don’t get me wrong, there were tonnes of cart recovery apps available. The top results, the "Top 10" lists, all relied on exit-popups, and auto-emails. I didn’t want an app to take an auto-action by auto-sending an email, or auto-sending a Facebook message. I wanted to be told, so I could take action on it personally. I needed this because I learned how important the one-on-one relationship with my own customer was.
So I called up one of my friends, who was also the developer on my first start-up, and one weekend later Scout was born. It was stupid simple. 20 minutes after an abandoned checkout, Scout would email me with the key details I needed. When I got this email all I had to do was tap the phone number in the email and my phone would automatically start dialling. It wasn’t an exciting or sexy process. It wasn’t even very hard. There was no user interface to design, there was no website to develop, it was just a hacked prototype with one simple, useful, function. If an abandoned checkout, then email me. And it just took a weekend to build.
I used this prototype of Scout for my own needs for several months. It was easier to manage because I was push notified when I needed to take an action. It maintained my high recovery rate. And most importantly, it was fun to know when an abandon happened in real-time, it made my site feel more alive.
Bend the conversion curve
Having used it for a few months and not seeing any slowdown in its utility for my store, we decided this was a tactic every merchant should have in their sales strategy. We iterated on the first version of the email-only alert channel and made it a Facebook Messenger bot, sort of like a customer relationship focused personal assistant. Scout's job would be to alert merchants when a customer abandoned their checkout, and give you their checkout details.
So we published the free app in the Shopify App Store and one review at a time, we realized it was as useful for many others as it was for us. Merchants were sending thank you emails to us, and it was here we felt we had found our first glimmer of that ever illusive "Product-Market Fit."
You have to remember, during this time both my friend and I had full-time jobs, and I was also running my bidet store. Scout was in no way near something resembling a business. And we didn’t approach it at all to be its own business. We just wanted to put something out into the world that would have an impact. Plain and simple. Our first few installs came organically from the Shopify App Store, and a few weeks later we had a small spike as a result of Felix Thea’s Shopify Masters Podcast where, as a guest I spoke about Nadeef and mentioned Scout. We didn’t do any marketing for it until we reached about 1,000 merchants through organic search, which took over a year to achieve.
It felt good making an impact for so many entrepreneurs, but we didn’t feel we had anything to quit our jobs for, yet…

What is "Product-Market Fit"?

Finding product-market fit is a term used very frequently in the startup or entrepreneurial circles. If you’ve found product-market fit, it means you’ve figured out how to consistently deliver value to a group of people (and get paid as a result).
The two components in this equation are Product and Market. In my experience, the key is to start with the market. It’s important to start with the market because that’s the big immovable environment you’re in. It’s uncertain, it’s changing, there are producers and consumers operating in it already. One can’t create a market, one can only play in it, and so the market is the "hard part."
The product side of the equation is the easy part. These days if you can dream it, you can figure out how to make it, or get it made. For example, if you want to build a skateboard that can be converted into a surfboard, you could probably figure that out. Let's assume you've done that, it looks great, and has tonnes of cool features like an intergrated smartphone app! Awesome, great work!
But now that it's built, who’s going to buy it? Where do they live, what's the population of all the surf-friendly cities? Who suffers badly enough from carrying two boards? How big is the problem? How much are people willing to pay for this? How often do they need to buy parts/replace their boards?
The point is, if you confident in your answers to the above questions and your ability to establish a distribution and marketing strategy to your ideal target market, then it makes sense to start product developerment. The same rules apply for app development.
I will clarify that I didn’t think Scout had enough of a product-market fit at the time. I thought we had found some fit, but we still had (have) a long way to go. After all, it is a free app and no one pays for it, so we don’t really have a way to measure if it valuable enough that people pay for it.
The way this went down for us was simple. We were trying to solve my problem first. Being one of the participants in the "market" that had a problem with online sales, I slowly learned what I needed. And when I saw it helped/worked/was awesome, I had de-risked the product enough to feel comfortable going to market with it. In my case, it was as simple as publishing Scout to the app store AFTER knowing it was working for me.
Build, measure, learn diagram
This is again, why the advice of falling in love with the problem, is so great. Because it forces you to think about the market, and its needs, first.

Iterating the Product

Fast forward about a year after using Scout. I was looking through my list of customers, ordered from highest Lifetime Value (LTV) to lowest, and noticed something really fascinating. Eight out of my top 10 customers had originally abandoned their checkout and were individuals I had personally reached out over the phone. This means that by calling my abandoned checkout customers I was not only recovering the sale, but as a result they were turning into VIP customers.
This was a huge wake up call because it helped me understand the real problem in my online sales strategy. If calling my abandoned checkout customers resulted in them becoming loyal customers, what if I also called those who bought without abandoning? If the one-on-one phone call is the common denominator for the high retention rate, why not apply it to more customers?
Thinking back to the phone conversations over the previous 12 months I realized the most valuable bi-product of asking for feedback was not the sale itself. Rather, it was the lasting brand impression that a friendly, pre-sale service call had on my customer. Suddenly my high recovery rate made so much sense. The phone call earned trust with my customers and they were happy to come back and do business with me.
With this realization came clarity about our app focus. Creating customer conversations. Customer relationships are today's small business competitive advantage. And so Scout had its first major iteration, the opportunity we've decided to pursue is to enable customer relationships. We decided Scout’s job for each and every merchant that installs it, is to identify these relationship building opportunities and turn them into one-on-one conversations.
I like the below diagram (as opposed to the one earlier above) for explaining the concept in more detail because it outlines another key step, which is to test your hypothesis. Once you’ve identifying a new problem you want to solve, next thing you should do is run a test to see if your solution will work. If you can solve it, then you should build something to systemize it. If you can’t at least prove your hypothesis is true even a little bit, then I wouldn’t recommend investing more time in building a systemized solution (the product).
Identify/test/build/learn diagram
Once you’ve gone through the loop at least once, you should have identified opportunities for improvements, and this is where Scout is today. Currently we feel we’re on the Learn phase in our third loop.
For those who are interested in the math of our second "Measure" step as it related to my store’s results after 12 months using using Scout:
My top 10 customers had spent at least $600 on my store, through an average of 3 or more purchases. My top three had spent at least $1,000 in 5+ orders. As a comparison, the average customer LTV is $100.
Eight out of my top 10 overall customers were originally abandoned checkouts that I had called and recovered. They went on to be way more likely to become returning and word-of-mouth customers. Based on this, it was safe to say I needed to focus on getting more people on the phone, regardless of whether they abandoned first or not. This was the most recent learning which fueled the next round of product iterations.

Generating Installs

The Shopify App Store is pretty saturated today. There are so many apps on there already, many popular apps even have dozens of copycats. This makes it hard to market apps to merchants, because there is so much noise that’s keeping them from finding your app.
I wish I had some secret formula we used to grow our installs. What I will say is that the vast majority of installs come straight from app store ranking, which I believe is mostly dependant on the number of 5 star reviews and your usable of the right keywords. I’ve added a screenshot of our first 9 months below to show you what the growth looked like in the early days.
first 9 months of installs
You can see that for the first 4 months, we only generated 20 installs. And three of those were from my own store and a couple friends’. The other 17 I believe probably came from the Shopify Master Podcast that I was featured on. To be fair, remember that at this time we were not focused on Scout at all. I had my full-time job, as well as my bidet store, so there were no marketing efforts put into Scout whatsoever. So how did the growth suddenly pick up in January 2017?
I believe it had a lot to do with positive merchant reviews of the app. I think the app store’s algorithms started picking up the reviews we were generating and this caused a sort of upward cycle. Based on this, my advice would be, in order to grow your app installs, focus on your merchant support. Offer the best customer support you possibly can, and keep providing this level of support. It’s worked for us in the past, and it continues to work for us. Every few weeks when we generate several positive reviews in quick succession we watch our installs over the next few days, and it is noticeably larger.
Just like the theme of our apps, of enabling merchants to provide great customer experience, we do the same for our service. We are an app development merchant to business owners. We saw it working in terms of making product sales online, why wouldn’t it work for app companies trying to sell to other businesses?
So far the story checks out.

Customer Experience is Important (because it’s hard)

In my research around ecommerce success stories, I came across Zappos. Their business model was so on point I had to create some content around it in the form of several vlogs. Our series of vlogs talks about several topics around small businesses, especially the advantage that we have as small businesses. Hint: it has a lot to do with our ability to provide a superior customer experience.
To get back to Zappos, Zappos is an online shoe store based in Las Vegas, Nevada, that was eventually acquired by Amazon for $1.2 billion. It just sold shoes, the same shoes you’d find in any regular store, but it did so with a militant focus on the customer experience.
They do this so well that their business has a 75% repurchase rate. Even though it's an online retail business model, I strongly feel the same principles apply to all sorts of models, including SaaS, consulting, whatever.
So how did Zappos do this? They did this by reinvesting a portion of each sale’s revenue, back into the customer’s experience. So instead of taking $20 from $100 sale and giving it to Facebook or Google ads in the hope of acquiring a new customer, they would use that $20 to upgrade their shipping to overnight, send a free pizza, or offer unlimited free returns. This not only made sure they retained the customer (repurchasing customers spent more and bought more frequently), but they also created free word-of-mouth customers through the advocate marketing as a result of the great experience. Tony Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos went on to write a book called Delivering Happiness about this idea, which I would highly reccommend for all merchants.
Speaking of great books, another book also further opened my eyes to the lost opportunities at businesses who don’t focus on the customer experience. Joey Coleman’s Never Lose a Customer Again
opening chapter highlights an interesting ratio of 43:1. For every 43 books about sales or marketing, there is only one book about customer service, experience, or retention. That means the education around creating a customer far outweighs the education around keeping the customer. But why? It's a known fact retention provides more profitability than new acqusitions.
Thinking about why this is, I believe it has less to do with the difficulty of creating "wow" customer experiences, and more to do with how ridiculously easy it is to automate ads and marketing campaigns. I don’t think we’re against doing hard things, but when presented with the easy option, that’s what merchants will take.
Cycle of momentum
If the "orthodox" marketing tactics can be automated (and they can), you should also incorporate the unorthodox campaigns. Things like sending a free pizza and handwritten thank you notes, will close the loop for a complete marketing strategy.
Whether you’re marketing physical goods, or SaaS apps, or even professional services, it’s easy to want to automate everything. Automating Facebook and Google ads, automating email campaigns, automating chatbots, automating discounts, popups, and special offers, automating dropshipping; it’s really easy to do this, and the app stores are overflowing with apps that automate. It’s clear automation is the future, but there is no competitive advantage here.
And so in order to stand out, I’ve learned you can’t automate the hard things. You should try to do the important hard things personally, because it’s in those moments that you will build brand reputation and value.

More than One Solution (to the Problem)

We went from running a Shopify store earning several thousand dollars per month, to developing a suite of apps used by over 10,000 merchants.
Working on Scout, and seeing the success from it, we started ideating other ways of getting customers on the phone. Why does only an abandoned checkout need to result in the phone call? What if a customer is interested in purchasing but hasn’t clicked "add to cart" yet? To capture these unrealized leads we developed the callback app called Raven Callback. Raven turns website visits into qualified sales calls. It helped tremendously on my store, because it started to capture more leads due to its lightweight nature. I didn't think the contact/email form was working for me because it’s too much stuff for customers to type, and they perceive replies would take up to 48 hours, so why bother? Same with the livechat, since majority of small businesses don’t reply immediately. The “immediate” callback did wonders and customers continuously commented it was the best customer service they’ve experienced. So, we ran with Raven as well, based on the success I had with my own store we published it on the Shopify App Store.
Raven only has a few dozen merchants on our paid plans, but just those merchants have directly generated over $500,000 for themselves in sales over the past 3 months since we launched. Again, we’re seeing the phone channel as a great medium to close sales, and it works really well for certain products and services. I think any store that wants to have one-on-one conversations with customers, especially those who sell products over $200, should seriously consider the phone as a sales channel.

What’s Next

Now we’re working on publishing our third app, again, inspired from running my bidet store. It’s not phone related, but it is related to customer experience and building a relationship with your VIP customers. The app is called Pizza Party, and it sends free pizzas to those VIP customers.
Based on the learnings from the "failed" hand-written note product, this time, I'm focusing on more customer conversations about it before going ahead and publishing the app. We're not sure yet when we'll officially launch it, it's about half-way done, but I'm happy to chat with anyone who wants to use it for their store. It’s really fun and easy to use. When merchants install it they just outline the parameters of a "great" customer, like order value, lifetime value or order frequency, and then confirm which customers to send to. For example, if you consider any customer who spends at least $200 per order on your store as a “VIP” customer, then Pizza Party will send a free “thank you” pizza to that customer on your behalf. The merchant pays for the pizza, and we take a small percentage, but it’s super easy to get started and really fun to use. The feedback I was getting from my bidet customers who I sent free pizzas was just too awesome to pass up on this app idea. I sent free large cheese pizzas to customers who bought a few hundred dollars worth of bidets last winter and that small token of my appreciation turned into a few hundred dollars in more revenue; it was triple digit ROI. Customers said it was the best customer service they’ve ever had, ended up sharing the story with their friends, which then resulted in word-of-mouth sales.
If you’ve read this far you’ve probably put together the pattern here. I tried a marketing experiment for my Nadeef Bidet store, and if it worked really well I tried to systemize it. By focusing on solving our own problems first, we now have 3 apps, 3 more in private beta, and plans to roll out for several other platforms very soon. And thanks for reading! If you want to get in touch, or have any quetions, feel free to reach out via email or Instagram
I’ll sign off with a Haiku:
What better problem
Than the one you yourself face
To solve for others too
Liked this text interview? Check out the full interview with photos.
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Fall in love with the problem, not the solution.

Hey - Pat from StarterStory.com here with a writeup from Ahmad Iqbal.
Ahmad was one of the first people I interviewed at Starter Story for his bidet business. Now he's working on building Shopify apps and wrote this awesome post about his transition:
One of the best pieces of advice I was given was to Fall in love with the problem, not the solution. And it wasn’t until I came across a big problem that I realized how perfect this advice is.

My name is Ahmad Iqbal and I’m currently running two online businesses. I am both an Ecommerce Merchant as well as an Ecommerce App Developer.
The first of the two is my online store where I sell hand-held bidets. The later business, borne of the need to increase bidet sales, guided me to designing and developing apps for other merchants, like me.
In this post I want to illustrate how I made the leap from selling bidets online, to building an app design and development team. It’s strange for me to say it out loud, "how does one go from selling butt cleaning appliances to building and marketing apps?" So when Pat from Starter Story reached out to do a follow-up piece to my original post I was happy to try and put my experiences into words. Not just for others to read, but for myself in documenting my journey.
If the title hasn’t already given it away, this will be about my relationship with Problems.
I'm going to start at the middle (quiting my job) and then go to 2015 when this 'starter story' actually started, followed by the meat and potatos of the frameworks we use in our app development model.
My desk and kanban board

Quitting my Job & Making Money through Shopify Apps

From 2015 to 2017 I was working full-time at a global Big Four firm as a Senior Technology Consultant. My job was to help Fortune 1000 companies get their products to market faster. During my time growing my bidet store, I was starting to become more and more immersed in growth marketing. So much so, that I spun out a marketing framework I used for myself and called it the "Agile Marketing Framework" for the firm. Everything I was learning on my own time for growing my own business, was helping me be better for my big clients at my job. But even though doing well at work felt great, it was WAY more fun helping small businesses. In 2017 I had decided the world needs better small businesses, not bigger big businesses.
But in order to quit my job (my Nadeef bidet sales were taking a hit with my attention now diverted between my demanding full-time job, app design/development, and supporting Scout merchants) I needed to figure out if building apps on Shopify would be a viable business model. Was it even possible to earn a living selling apps full time?
It seemed like a tough proposition. I would need thousands of merchants paying at least $20/month to create a successful business. I didn’t think it would be possible, until I came across the Bold Commerce story. This four person team in Winnipeg, Manitoba, had almost the same story as us. Merchants first, identified gaps in the app store, and deciding to build apps on Shopify. Bold Commerce now employs almost 300 people, with no outside funding to date, and with their growth solely on the Shopify platform. This case study was enough to convince us to take the leap, I wanted us to be like Bold.
Having decided it was in fact possible to build positive cash flows through app subscriptions on Shopify, next thing we had to do was get our financing organized.
We decided to take three months to prepare and think about if this problem was something we wanted to dedicate the next several years of our lives to. This three month period was my time to save as much money as I could, and test my own conviction. This time was a constant decision making cycle, where I continually asked myself if the market was big enough, if the problem was widespread enough, and if I had the right pieces in place. It was an important lesson from my first startup attempt almost seven years earlier. In my first startup we picked the wrong market, at the wrong time, with no experience or resources, and the result was a four year uphill campaign that left us in pieces.
So before quitting my job, every dollar of income was saved, Bitcoins were cashed, plans to move out of my parent’s basement were halted, and I started creating a partner network across the ecommerce ecosystem.
We had enough to focus on building our apps for 36 months without worrying about money or raising venture capital. Today we’re on month 12 out of 36.

Let's Talk About the Failure First

Instead of jupming straight into Scout (the first app we built and the main subject of this post) let me first tell you about one of our apps that did not do well. Our "hand-written" notes app was attempted after the initial success of Scout, but it was a wake up call to stay focused on the problem, not the solution.
After quitting my job, and landing on the bigger problem of customer experience as our company mandate (more on this later), we decided to offer hand-written note services. We figured customers would love getting a handwritten note from merchants, so with little else research, or testing, we went ahead and started building out this crazy printer.
A video about how it worked
The app would connect to your Shopify backend, identify your VIP customers, and then convert that customer information into a special Adobe Illustrator script that would feed into the printer. The printer then would proceed to start writing the notes in a handwritten style font (both the letter copy and the addresses on the envelope).
We rolled this app out as an added skill to Scout. Basically, when Scout would alert you about the previous days’ VIP customers, it now offered an additional button labeled "Send Handwrote Card" which when pressed would instigate our printer. When the card was printed, I’d just have to put the postage stamp on it and drop it off at the post office which was across the street from our co-working space.
I believe this idea failed because I fell in love with the solution (cool looking robotic handwriting printer) rather than the problem it was designed to solve. I still believe there is value in this idea, but by overbuilding the solution first, we lost track of what was most important.
If I had to do it again I would have done a few things differently:
1. Manually write and fulfill the cards myself while doing the merchant discovery
Because there exists an intimate relationship between selling the service, and having to manually having to fulfill the service. It gives you more appreciation for the process and what’s important to do it successfully. Like with Scout, where I called my customers up manually through finding their details myself, and only after seeing how to do it well proceeded to systemize it with an app.
2. Personally talk to each merchant who wanted cards written
This would have been the best (only?) way to validate the value of the service. How important is this service for merchants? What else do they wish they could give as 'thank you's? What price would they be willing to pay on high volume handwritten cards? How much does it bother them that the cards are not personally written by the brand, and hence not authentic?
3. Write 0 lines of new code
Why divert precious development time and resources on something if A) it’s possible to do manually, and B) there is no guarantee that it’s a lucrative idea?
Thinking back, this idea was destined to fail for several reasons. Writing notes is very time consuming, there isn’t enough volume in the merchants who wanted to use it, the authenticity of the cards dies if customers figure out it’s not actually written by a person (even though it fooled almost anyone who looked at it). Even if we had done this the lean way and manually tested first, I still think we would have stopped offering the solution. But if I had just followed my four step Identify, Test, Build, Measure framework we would have saved the $4,000 we ended up spending designing and developing the software, and sourcing this printer and it’s parts. I would have found out in the Test section of the cycle that this is way too time consuming and merchants have too many questions about it to feel comfortable signing off on handwritten notes on high volume.
The handwritten note printer is now a piece of decoration at our office, but hey, at least it makes for a good conversation! And it taught me what I'm about to share with you today...

Identifying a Problem

Rewind back to 2015, a few months after opening my Nadeef hand-held bidet store on Shopify I found myself tackling the abandoned checkout problem, something every merchants probably faces. For every three potential customers that reached the final stage of checkout, one wasn’t pulling out their credit card. The way I saw it, I was leaking 33% of my sales in the final, most crucial, "moment of truth."
I was new to this field, I didn’t know the jargon or the best practices, all I knew was I needed to plug this hole. I went down a rabbit hole of recommendations, blog posts, forum threads, apps and YouTube videos. I tried many tactics, with varying degrees of "success" but later I realized I was asking myself the wrong question.
Instead of asking "How can I recovery these sales?" I should have been asking “Why are customer abandoning their checkout?”
At first I tried to extrapolate why they abandoned through the default go-to answers most blog posts claim are the reasons, like shipping timeframes, pricing, return policies, etc. But I knew these weren’t the real issues causing the abandoned cart because I would address them in my auto-recovery emails, exit-popups, Facebook retargeting campaigns, or all the other ways I would try to reduce abandons.
As simple as those recovery tactics may seem, I now know I was overthinking it. There was only one thing I could do to figure out why someone abandoned their checkout. Pick up the phone, and ask them one-on-one.
Before I go on, I should state that my recovery rate at this point was around 10%. And Shopify’s dashboard told me this was a good thing. I just didn’t think that was good at all. It meant that for every 10 people who reached the final stage of their checkout only one person actually returned to buy? Sure it's better than $0, but what about the other 90% who aren't returning? Surely we could do better than 1/10...
...and I wanted to talk to those nine people.
Calling my abandoned checkout customers changed everything. It changed my whole perspective about how to do business, and it continues to change it even now. At first, there was hesitation to call up a customer out of the blue, but the desire to figure out the problem far outweighed any "worst-case" awkward conversation. Not to mention, they weren’t cold leads, these were highly interested customer who reached the final steps of making a purchase. In my head I kept telling myself this was exactly as if someone walked into a store, grabbed some items, placed them on the checkout counter, but just as they were about to pull out their wallet, they turned around and walked out the door. Wouldn’t the store owner ask what’s up? So I just smiled and dialled.
The results were tremendous.
I went from recovering 10% of my abandoned checkouts from auto-emails, to recovering 55% when I got them on the phone. Not only that but by gathering feedback and identifying holes in my offering the percentage of abandons slowly decreased as well.
I’ve outlined my learnings from calling customers in this diagram

Creating a Solution

I saw my process was working, but now I needed to systemize it so I could maintain consistency in my callbacks. I quickly learned that the longer I waited to call the abandoned customer back the less likely I would be able to recover the sale. I really just needed an alert app, one that would push notify me as soon as someone abandoned, tell me what products they left, and their phone number. There was nothing in the app store that provided this function.
Don’t get me wrong, there were tonnes of cart recovery apps available. The top results, the "Top 10" lists, all relied on exit-popups, and auto-emails. I didn’t want an app to take an auto-action by auto-sending an email, or auto-sending a Facebook message. I wanted to be told, so I could take action on it personally. I needed this because I learned how important the one-on-one relationship with my own customer was.
So I called up one of my friends, who was also the developer on my first start-up, and one weekend later Scout was born. It was stupid simple. 20 minutes after an abandoned checkout, Scout would email me with the key details I needed. When I got this email all I had to do was tap the phone number in the email and my phone would automatically start dialling. It wasn’t an exciting or sexy process. It wasn’t even very hard. There was no user interface to design, there was no website to develop, it was just a hacked prototype with one simple, useful, function. If an abandoned checkout, then email me. And it just took a weekend to build.
I used this prototype of Scout for my own needs for several months. It was easier to manage because I was push notified when I needed to take an action. It maintained my high recovery rate. And most importantly, it was fun to know when an abandon happened in real-time, it made my site feel more alive.
Bend the conversion curve
Having used it for a few months and not seeing any slowdown in its utility for my store, we decided this was a tactic every merchant should have in their sales strategy. We iterated on the first version of the email-only alert channel and made it a Facebook Messenger bot, sort of like a customer relationship focused personal assistant. Scout's job would be to alert merchants when a customer abandoned their checkout, and give you their checkout details.
So we published the free app in the Shopify App Store and one review at a time, we realized it was as useful for many others as it was for us. Merchants were sending thank you emails to us, and it was here we felt we had found our first glimmer of that ever illusive "Product-Market Fit."
You have to remember, during this time both my friend and I had full-time jobs, and I was also running my bidet store. Scout was in no way near something resembling a business. And we didn’t approach it at all to be its own business. We just wanted to put something out into the world that would have an impact. Plain and simple. Our first few installs came organically from the Shopify App Store, and a few weeks later we had a small spike as a result of Felix Thea’s Shopify Masters Podcast where, as a guest I spoke about Nadeef and mentioned Scout. We didn’t do any marketing for it until we reached about 1,000 merchants through organic search, which took over a year to achieve.
It felt good making an impact for so many entrepreneurs, but we didn’t feel we had anything to quit our jobs for, yet…

What is "Product-Market Fit"?

Finding product-market fit is a term used very frequently in the startup or entrepreneurial circles. If you’ve found product-market fit, it means you’ve figured out how to consistently deliver value to a group of people (and get paid as a result).
The two components in this equation are Product and Market. In my experience, the key is to start with the market. It’s important to start with the market because that’s the big immovable environment you’re in. It’s uncertain, it’s changing, there are producers and consumers operating in it already. One can’t create a market, one can only play in it, and so the market is the "hard part."
The product side of the equation is the easy part. These days if you can dream it, you can figure out how to make it, or get it made. For example, if you want to build a skateboard that can be converted into a surfboard, you could probably figure that out. Let's assume you've done that, it looks great, and has tonnes of cool features like an intergrated smartphone app! Awesome, great work!
But now that it's built, who’s going to buy it? Where do they live, what's the population of all the surf-friendly cities? Who suffers badly enough from carrying two boards? How big is the problem? How much are people willing to pay for this? How often do they need to buy parts/replace their boards?
The point is, if you confident in your answers to the above questions and your ability to establish a distribution and marketing strategy to your ideal target market, then it makes sense to start product developerment. The same rules apply for app development.
I will clarify that I didn’t think Scout had enough of a product-market fit at the time. I thought we had found some fit, but we still had (have) a long way to go. After all, it is a free app and no one pays for it, so we don’t really have a way to measure if it valuable enough that people pay for it.
The way this went down for us was simple. We were trying to solve my problem first. Being one of the participants in the "market" that had a problem with online sales, I slowly learned what I needed. And when I saw it helped/worked/was awesome, I had de-risked the product enough to feel comfortable going to market with it. In my case, it was as simple as publishing Scout to the app store AFTER knowing it was working for me.
Build, measure, learn diagram
This is again, why the advice of falling in love with the problem, is so great. Because it forces you to think about the market, and its needs, first.

Iterating the Product

Fast forward about a year after using Scout. I was looking through my list of customers, ordered from highest Lifetime Value (LTV) to lowest, and noticed something really fascinating. Eight out of my top 10 customers had originally abandoned their checkout and were individuals I had personally reached out over the phone. This means that by calling my abandoned checkout customers I was not only recovering the sale, but as a result they were turning into VIP customers.
This was a huge wake up call because it helped me understand the real problem in my online sales strategy. If calling my abandoned checkout customers resulted in them becoming loyal customers, what if I also called those who bought without abandoning? If the one-on-one phone call is the common denominator for the high retention rate, why not apply it to more customers?
Thinking back to the phone conversations over the previous 12 months I realized the most valuable bi-product of asking for feedback was not the sale itself. Rather, it was the lasting brand impression that a friendly, pre-sale service call had on my customer. Suddenly my high recovery rate made so much sense. The phone call earned trust with my customers and they were happy to come back and do business with me.
With this realization came clarity about our app focus. Creating customer conversations. Customer relationships are today's small business competitive advantage. And so Scout had its first major iteration, the opportunity we've decided to pursue is to enable customer relationships. We decided Scout’s job for each and every merchant that installs it, is to identify these relationship building opportunities and turn them into one-on-one conversations.
I like the below diagram (as opposed to the one earlier above) for explaining the concept in more detail because it outlines another key step, which is to test your hypothesis. Once you’ve identifying a new problem you want to solve, next thing you should do is run a test to see if your solution will work. If you can solve it, then you should build something to systemize it. If you can’t at least prove your hypothesis is true even a little bit, then I wouldn’t recommend investing more time in building a systemized solution (the product).
Identify/test/build/learn diagram
Once you’ve gone through the loop at least once, you should have identified opportunities for improvements, and this is where Scout is today. Currently we feel we’re on the Learn phase in our third loop.
For those who are interested in the math of our second "Measure" step as it related to my store’s results after 12 months using using Scout:
My top 10 customers had spent at least $600 on my store, through an average of 3 or more purchases. My top three had spent at least $1,000 in 5+ orders. As a comparison, the average customer LTV is $100.
Eight out of my top 10 overall customers were originally abandoned checkouts that I had called and recovered. They went on to be way more likely to become returning and word-of-mouth customers. Based on this, it was safe to say I needed to focus on getting more people on the phone, regardless of whether they abandoned first or not. This was the most recent learning which fueled the next round of product iterations.

Generating Installs

The Shopify App Store is pretty saturated today. There are so many apps on there already, many popular apps even have dozens of copycats. This makes it hard to market apps to merchants, because there is so much noise that’s keeping them from finding your app.
I wish I had some secret formula we used to grow our installs. What I will say is that the vast majority of installs come straight from app store ranking, which I believe is mostly dependant on the number of 5 star reviews and your usable of the right keywords. I’ve added a screenshot of our first 9 months below to show you what the growth looked like in the early days.
first 9 months of installs
You can see that for the first 4 months, we only generated 20 installs. And three of those were from my own store and a couple friends’. The other 17 I believe probably came from the Shopify Master Podcast that I was featured on. To be fair, remember that at this time we were not focused on Scout at all. I had my full-time job, as well as my bidet store, so there were no marketing efforts put into Scout whatsoever. So how did the growth suddenly pick up in January 2017?
I believe it had a lot to do with positive merchant reviews of the app. I think the app store’s algorithms started picking up the reviews we were generating and this caused a sort of upward cycle. Based on this, my advice would be, in order to grow your app installs, focus on your merchant support. Offer the best customer support you possibly can, and keep providing this level of support. It’s worked for us in the past, and it continues to work for us. Every few weeks when we generate several positive reviews in quick succession we watch our installs over the next few days, and it is noticeably larger.
Just like the theme of our apps, of enabling merchants to provide great customer experience, we do the same for our service. We are an app development merchant to business owners. We saw it working in terms of making product sales online, why wouldn’t it work for app companies trying to sell to other businesses?
So far the story checks out.

Customer Experience is Important (because it’s hard)

In my research around ecommerce success stories, I came across Zappos. Their business model was so on point I had to create some content around it in the form of several vlogs. Our series of vlogs talks about several topics around small businesses, especially the advantage that we have as small businesses. Hint: it has a lot to do with our ability to provide a superior customer experience.
To get back to Zappos, Zappos is an online shoe store based in Las Vegas, Nevada, that was eventually acquired by Amazon for $1.2 billion. It just sold shoes, the same shoes you’d find in any regular store, but it did so with a militant focus on the customer experience.
They do this so well that their business has a 75% repurchase rate. Even though it's an online retail business model, I strongly feel the same principles apply to all sorts of models, including SaaS, consulting, whatever.
So how did Zappos do this? They did this by reinvesting a portion of each sale’s revenue, back into the customer’s experience. So instead of taking $20 from $100 sale and giving it to Facebook or Google ads in the hope of acquiring a new customer, they would use that $20 to upgrade their shipping to overnight, send a free pizza, or offer unlimited free returns. This not only made sure they retained the customer (repurchasing customers spent more and bought more frequently), but they also created free word-of-mouth customers through the advocate marketing as a result of the great experience. Tony Hsieh, the CEO of Zappos went on to write a book called Delivering Happiness about this idea, which I would highly reccommend for all merchants.
Speaking of great books, another book also further opened my eyes to the lost opportunities at businesses who don’t focus on the customer experience. Joey Coleman’s Never Lose a Customer Again
opening chapter highlights an interesting ratio of 43:1. For every 43 books about sales or marketing, there is only one book about customer service, experience, or retention. That means the education around creating a customer far outweighs the education around keeping the customer. But why? It's a known fact retention provides more profitability than new acqusitions.
Thinking about why this is, I believe it has less to do with the difficulty of creating "wow" customer experiences, and more to do with how ridiculously easy it is to automate ads and marketing campaigns. I don’t think we’re against doing hard things, but when presented with the easy option, that’s what merchants will take.
Cycle of momentum
If the "orthodox" marketing tactics can be automated (and they can), you should also incorporate the unorthodox campaigns. Things like sending a free pizza and handwritten thank you notes, will close the loop for a complete marketing strategy.
Whether you’re marketing physical goods, or SaaS apps, or even professional services, it’s easy to want to automate everything. Automating Facebook and Google ads, automating email campaigns, automating chatbots, automating discounts, popups, and special offers, automating dropshipping; it’s really easy to do this, and the app stores are overflowing with apps that automate. It’s clear automation is the future, but there is no competitive advantage here.
And so in order to stand out, I’ve learned you can’t automate the hard things. You should try to do the important hard things personally, because it’s in those moments that you will build brand reputation and value.

More than One Solution (to the Problem)

We went from running a Shopify store earning several thousand dollars per month, to developing a suite of apps used by over 10,000 merchants.
Working on Scout, and seeing the success from it, we started ideating other ways of getting customers on the phone. Why does only an abandoned checkout need to result in the phone call? What if a customer is interested in purchasing but hasn’t clicked "add to cart" yet? To capture these unrealized leads we developed the callback app called Raven Callback. Raven turns website visits into qualified sales calls. It helped tremendously on my store, because it started to capture more leads due to its lightweight nature. I didn't think the contact/email form was working for me because it’s too much stuff for customers to type, and they perceive replies would take up to 48 hours, so why bother? Same with the livechat, since majority of small businesses don’t reply immediately. The “immediate” callback did wonders and customers continuously commented it was the best customer service they’ve experienced. So, we ran with Raven as well, based on the success I had with my own store we published it on the Shopify App Store.
Raven only has a few dozen merchants on our paid plans, but just those merchants have directly generated over $500,000 for themselves in sales over the past 3 months since we launched. Again, we’re seeing the phone channel as a great medium to close sales, and it works really well for certain products and services. I think any store that wants to have one-on-one conversations with customers, especially those who sell products over $200, should seriously consider the phone as a sales channel.

What’s Next

Now we’re working on publishing our third app, again, inspired from running my bidet store. It’s not phone related, but it is related to customer experience and building a relationship with your VIP customers. The app is called Pizza Party, and it sends free pizzas to those VIP customers.
Based on the learnings from the "failed" hand-written note product, this time, I'm focusing on more customer conversations about it before going ahead and publishing the app. We're not sure yet when we'll officially launch it, it's about half-way done, but I'm happy to chat with anyone who wants to use it for their store. It’s really fun and easy to use. When merchants install it they just outline the parameters of a "great" customer, like order value, lifetime value or order frequency, and then confirm which customers to send to. For example, if you consider any customer who spends at least $200 per order on your store as a “VIP” customer, then Pizza Party will send a free “thank you” pizza to that customer on your behalf. The merchant pays for the pizza, and we take a small percentage, but it’s super easy to get started and really fun to use. The feedback I was getting from my bidet customers who I sent free pizzas was just too awesome to pass up on this app idea. I sent free large cheese pizzas to customers who bought a few hundred dollars worth of bidets last winter and that small token of my appreciation turned into a few hundred dollars in more revenue; it was triple digit ROI. Customers said it was the best customer service they’ve ever had, ended up sharing the story with their friends, which then resulted in word-of-mouth sales.
If you’ve read this far you’ve probably put together the pattern here. I tried a marketing experiment for my Nadeef Bidet store, and if it worked really well I tried to systemize it. By focusing on solving our own problems first, we now have 3 apps, 3 more in private beta, and plans to roll out for several other platforms very soon. And thanks for reading! If you want to get in touch, or have any quetions, feel free to reach out via email or Instagram
I’ll sign off with a Haiku:
What better problem
Than the one you yourself face
To solve for others too
Liked this text interview? Check out the full interview with photos.
submitted by youngrichntasteless to EntrepreneurRideAlong [link] [comments]

The fastest, easiest and cheapest way to send micro-donations (as well as Macro-payments) around the world, instantly: Bitcoin

So right now I can send you 10 cents or 1 million dollars instantly from my phone wallet, using bitcoin. Anywhere in the world, fee-free, instantly. The blockchain technology is amazing!, here is some info about it:
Decentralized/peer-to-peeworldwide distributed systems are the way to empower the people and bypass banks and all centralized financial institutions, the path to re-set the control from the few to the many, are the future for everything. The potential implications of the development of distributed consensus technologies is revolutionary.
We have now an open source peer to peer decentralized digital currency. It is very safe, since is cryptographically secured by a distributed global mathematical algorithm and public decentralized open source ledger, a revolutionary disruptive technology called 'Blockchain'. https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Block_chain
This could be the future of money for everything, from donations, micropayments, money transfers, online shopping and bill payments, etc.
Empowering and welcoming to the game to billions of unbanked people. And the blockchain peer-to-peer open source decentralized secure technology will be used for many more applications, like escrow, contracts, voting, global ledger, etc.
We shouldn't be like the ones that were dismissing the internet not long ago as a "den of pedophiles, drug dealers and terrorists". The blockchain is the biggest thing since the internet and will benefit also the billions of under and unbanked people.
Bill Gates: “Bitcoin Technology is Key” https://www.cryptocoinsnews.com/bill-gates-bitcoin-technology-key/
WSJ article about FINCEN recognizing bitcoin: http://online.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887323407104579037301852662422 Bloomberg article about IRS legitimizing bitcoin as property: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-25/bitcoin-is-property-not-currency-in-tax-system-irs-says.html
PayPal now lets shops accept Bitcoin: http://money.cnn.com/2014/09/26/technology/paypal-bitcoin/index.html?iid=HP_LN
Bitcoin goes mainstream: http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/sep/29/bitcoin-circle-cryptocurrency-jeremy-allaire
Bank Of England: Digital currencies and how do they work https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxDKE_gQX_M&feature=youtu.be
Transfer money anywhere, safely, no fees, no middlemen, no charge-backs for merchants and no fraud.
These are just physical businesses accepting bitcoin:
http://coinmap.org/
With tens of thousands more online:
http://www.coinjabber.com/
Some of the Big companies accepting Bitcoin:
PayPal, VirginGalactic, CheapAir, Uber, Wordpress,Wikipedia, Zynga,Dish Network,Suntimes, Gyft, CheapAir, TigerDirect, OverStock, Expedia, Newegg, 1-800-Flowers.com, Dell,LordandTaylor, Shopify, Foodler, Digital River, Scan.co, Overclockers.co.uk, Takeaway.com, Wix.com, Cheaperthansteam.com, eGifter.com, Etsy.com, King’s College, OKCupid, Mint.com, Pizzaforcoins.com, Reddit, Square, Twitch.tv, Zappos.com, Menufy
If you want to learn more:
http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/
https://www.weusecoins.com/en/
https://www.trybtc.com/
https://bitcoin.org/en/
http://www.thebitcoinpage.com/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP9-lAYngi4
Quotes:
"Not having an internet strategy in 1995 is the equivalent of not having a bitcoin strategy now.” -Moe Levin
“I’m a big fan of Bitcoin … Regulation of money supply needs to be depoliticized.” -Al Gore
“Bitcoin is a technological tour de force.” -Bill Gates
“Bitcoin will do to banks what email did to the postal industry.” -Rick Falkvinge
“With e-currency based on cryptographic proof, without the need to trust a third party middleman, money can be secure and transactions effortless.” -Satoshi Nakamoto Historical graph: How much bitcoin a $1 dollar can buy? https://i.imgur.com/pR4ptme.jpg
Runaway Dollar Inflation Graph: (Source: the FED) https://i.imgur.com/t8oBzH0.jpg
How safe is bitcoin?
https://i.imgur.com/CzyO1yv.jpg
submitted by teelm to millionairemakers [link] [comments]

Want to buy some new running shoes with my BTC.

Is there a vendor that specializes in running shoes? I like the adi-pure at the moment. Or, does someone sell Amazon gift cards for BTC? Thanks in advance guys.
submitted by Im_on_my_laptop to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

My Bitcoin Black Friday Totals: 2.67124986 BTC

snapCard orders:
https://www.joinsnapcard.com/home.html
$250 Amazon Card: 0.2412 BTC
http://app.gyft.com/me/cards/
Bitcoin Keychains: 0.0071 BTC
http://www.geekbitcoin.com/my-first-order-c-65/in-bitcoin-we-trust-keychains-free-p-294.html
A few BitCards: 0.0138 BTC
http://www.bit-card.de/cards.html
JerkySpot Jerky of the Month Club: 0.0678 BTC
http://jerkyspot.com/collections/gift-bags-variety-packs/products/beef-jerky-of-the-month-club
1300mW Blue Laser: 0.148 BTC
http://bitlasers.com/opencart/index.php?route=common/home
Bitcoin Sticker (Not sure if it's a scam though): 0.003362 BTC
http://www.thebtcprice.com/support-bitcoin/
If anyone knows how to get that site my shipping info, I'd appreciate it.
Symphony of Science donation: 0.00495436 BTC
http://symphonyofscience.com/donate.html
Bees Brothers Honey Gift Basket: 0.0369 BTC
http://www.beesbros.com/gift-box.html
Fr33 Aid donation: 0.00492718 BTC
http://www.fr33aid.com/donate/bitcoin/
MaleBasics Underwear: 0.03223957 BTC
http://malebasics.com/mens-underweatri-packs-underwear
MaleBasics had some cart problems, but were really nice about it. In the end, I'm glad I ordered.
Zappos $50 Gift Card: 0.035 BTC (after discount)
Another Zappos $50 Gift Card: 0.0439 BTC
http://app.gyft.com/me/cards/
Lollipops with insane flavors (I got wine): 0.022 BTC
http://www.lollyphile.com/
Loose tea (40% off!!!): 0.02946675 BTC
http://tealet.com/
Standing mirror: 0.1305 BTC
http://cmshomestore.com/collections/frontpage/products/nordic-sunrise-mirror-armoire
$2,000 Amazon Gift Card: 1.7374 BTC
http://app.gyft.com/me/cards/
submitted by bitcoinblackfrirocks to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

01-26 15:43 - 'We have put together a list of 100+ companies, in alphabetical order, that currently and will accept Bitcoins and Bitcoin Dollar as payment!' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/Bitcoindollar removed from /r/Bitcoin within 101-111min

'''
1-800-FLOWERS – the United States based online floral and gift retailer and distributor 4Chan – For premium services A Class Limousine - Pick you up and drop you off at Newark (N.J.) Airport Amazon – An online company that sells almost anything. Apple’s App Store - Buy music and any app on the Apple AppStore with bitcoins Badoo – Online dating network BigFishGames – Games for PC, Mac, and Smartphones (iPhone, Android, Windows) Bing by Microsoft – 2nd search engine to Google Bitcoin. Travel – a travel site that provides accommodation, apartments, attractions, bars, and beauty salons around the world Bitcoincoffee – Buy your favorite coffee online Bloomberg – Online newspaper Braintree – Research firm CEX – The trade-in chain has a shop in Glasgow, Scotland that accepts bitcoin CheapAir – Travel booking site for airline tickets, car rentals, hotels CoinMama: Buy Bitcoins with Credit Card Crowdtilt - The fastest and easiest way to pool funds with family and friends curryupnow - A total of 12 restaurants on the list of restaurants accept bitcoins in San Francisco Bay Area CVS – A pharmacy shop Dell - American privately owned multinational computer technology company Dish Network - An American direct-broadcast satellite service provider Dream Lover – Online relationship service Etsy Vendors – Original art and Jewelry creations Euro Pacific – A major precious metal dealer Expedia. com – Online travel booking agency ExpressVPN – High speed, ultra-secure VPN network EZTV – Torrents TV shows provider Famsa – Mexico’s biggest retailer Fancy - Discover amazing stuff, collect the things you love, buy it all in one place Fight for the Future – Leading organization finding for Internet freedom Fiverr – Get almost anything done for $5 Grass Hill Alpacas – A local farm in Haydenville, MA Green Man Gaming - Popular digital game reseller Grooveshark – Online music streaming service based in the United States Helen’s Pizza - Jersey City, N.J., you can get a slice of pizza for 0.00339 bitcoin by pointing your phone at a sign next to the cash register Home Depot - Office supplies store i-Pmart – A Malaysian online mobile phone and electronic parts retailer Intuit - an American software company that develops financial and tax preparation software and related services for small businesses, accountants and individuals. Jeffersons Store - A streetwear clothing store in Bergenfield, N.J Kmart - Retail products store Lionsgate Films - The production studio behind titles such as The Hunger Games and The Day After Tomorrow LOT Polish Airlines – A worldwide airline based in Poland Lumfile – Free cloud base file server – pay for premium services Mexico’s Universidad de las Américas Puebla – A major university in Mexico Microsoft – Software company Mint - Mint pulls all your financial accounts into one place. Set a budget, track your goals and do more MIT Coop Store - Massachusetts Institute of Technology student bookstore MovieTickets – Online movie ticket exchange/retailer mspinc – Respiratory medical equipment supplies store Museum of the Coastal Bend - 2200 East Red River Street, Victoria, Texas 77901, USA Namecheap - Domain name registrar Naughty America - Adult entertainment provider NCR Silver – Point of sales systems Newegg – Online electronics retailer now uses bitpay to accept bitcoin as payment OkCupid – Online dating site Old Fitzroy – A pub in Sydney, Australia One Shot Hotels – Spanish hotel chain Overstock – A company that sells big ticket items at lower prices due to overstocking PayPal / eBay - Credit card / payment processor / Auction Pembury Tavern – A pub in London, England PizzaForCoins - Domino’s Pizza signed up – pay for their pizza with bitcoins PSP Mollie – Dutch Payment Service Rakutan – A Japanese e-commerce giant RE/MAX London - UK-based franchisee of the global real estate network Reddit – You can buy premium features there with bitcoins Sacramento Kings – Professional Basketball team out in Sacramental California (NBA) San Jose Earthquakes – San Jose California Professional Soccer Team (MLS) Save the Children - Global charity organization Sears - Clothing and household products, electronic store Seoclerks. com – Get SEO work done on your site cheap SFU bookstore - Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada Shopify. com – An online store that allows anyone to sell their products ShopJoy – An Australian online retailer that sells novelty and unique gifts SimplePay - Nigeria’s most popular web and mobile-based wallet service Square – Payment processor that help small businesses accept credit cards using iPhone, Android or iPad State Republican Party – First State Republican Party to accept bitcoin donations Straub Auto Repairs - 477 Warburton Ave, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706 - (914) 478-1177 Stripe - San Francisco-based payments company Subway – Eat fresh Suntimes. com – Chicago based online newspaper T-Mobile Poland – T-Mobile’s Poland-based mobile phone top-up company Target – An American retailing company TechCrunch. com – IT blog Tesla – The car company The Libertarian Party – United States political party The Pink Cow – A diner in Tokyo, Japan The Pirate Bay - BitTorrent directories TigerDirect – Major electronic online retailer Victoria’s Secret – A lingerie outlet Virgin Galactic - Richard Branson company that includes Virgin Mobile and Virgin Airline World tourism- Group of 1560 Tour agencies worldwide. WebJet – Online travel agency Whole Foods – Organic food store (by purchasing gift card from Gyft) with your money, for free! Wikipedia - The Free Encyclopedia with 4 570 000+ article WordPress – An online company that allows user to create free blogs Yacht- base – Croatian yacht charter company Zappos – Online retailer Zynga – Mobile gaming
'''
We have put together a list of 100+ companies, in alphabetical order, that currently and will accept Bitcoins and Bitcoin Dollar as payment!
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: Bitcoindollar
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] We have put together a list of 100+ companies, in alphabetical order, that currently and will acc...

The following post by Bitcoindollar is being replicated because the post has been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7t4mch
The original post's content was as follows:
1-800-FLOWERS – the United States based online floral and gift retailer and distributor 4Chan – For premium services A Class Limousine - Pick you up and drop you off at Newark (N.J.) Airport Amazon – An online company that sells almost anything. Apple’s App Store - Buy music and any app on the Apple AppStore with bitcoins Badoo – Online dating network BigFishGames – Games for PC, Mac, and Smartphones (iPhone, Android, Windows) Bing by Microsoft – 2nd search engine to Google Bitcoin. Travel – a travel site that provides accommodation, apartments, attractions, bars, and beauty salons around the world Bitcoincoffee – Buy your favorite coffee online Bloomberg – Online newspaper Braintree – Research firm CEX – The trade-in chain has a shop in Glasgow, Scotland that accepts bitcoin CheapAir – Travel booking site for airline tickets, car rentals, hotels CoinMama: Buy Bitcoins with Credit Card Crowdtilt - The fastest and easiest way to pool funds with family and friends curryupnow - A total of 12 restaurants on the list of restaurants accept bitcoins in San Francisco Bay Area CVS – A pharmacy shop Dell - American privately owned multinational computer technology company Dish Network - An American direct-broadcast satellite service provider Dream Lover – Online relationship service Etsy Vendors – Original art and Jewelry creations Euro Pacific – A major precious metal dealer Expedia. com – Online travel booking agency ExpressVPN – High speed, ultra-secure VPN network EZTV – Torrents TV shows provider Famsa – Mexico’s biggest retailer Fancy - Discover amazing stuff, collect the things you love, buy it all in one place Fight for the Future – Leading organization finding for Internet freedom Fiverr – Get almost anything done for $5 Grass Hill Alpacas – A local farm in Haydenville, MA Green Man Gaming - Popular digital game reseller Grooveshark – Online music streaming service based in the United States Helen’s Pizza - Jersey City, N.J., you can get a slice of pizza for 0.00339 bitcoin by pointing your phone at a sign next to the cash register Home Depot - Office supplies store i-Pmart – A Malaysian online mobile phone and electronic parts retailer Intuit - an American software company that develops financial and tax preparation software and related services for small businesses, accountants and individuals. Jeffersons Store - A streetwear clothing store in Bergenfield, N.J Kmart - Retail products store Lionsgate Films - The production studio behind titles such as The Hunger Games and The Day After Tomorrow LOT Polish Airlines – A worldwide airline based in Poland Lumfile – Free cloud base file server – pay for premium services Mexico’s Universidad de las Américas Puebla – A major university in Mexico Microsoft – Software company Mint - Mint pulls all your financial accounts into one place. Set a budget, track your goals and do more MIT Coop Store - Massachusetts Institute of Technology student bookstore MovieTickets – Online movie ticket exchange/retailer mspinc – Respiratory medical equipment supplies store Museum of the Coastal Bend - 2200 East Red River Street, Victoria, Texas 77901, USA Namecheap - Domain name registrar Naughty America - Adult entertainment provider NCR Silver – Point of sales systems Newegg – Online electronics retailer now uses bitpay to accept bitcoin as payment OkCupid – Online dating site Old Fitzroy – A pub in Sydney, Australia One Shot Hotels – Spanish hotel chain Overstock – A company that sells big ticket items at lower prices due to overstocking PayPal / eBay - Credit card / payment processor / Auction Pembury Tavern – A pub in London, England PizzaForCoins - Domino’s Pizza signed up – pay for their pizza with bitcoins PSP Mollie – Dutch Payment Service Rakutan – A Japanese e-commerce giant RE/MAX London - UK-based franchisee of the global real estate network Reddit – You can buy premium features there with bitcoins Sacramento Kings – Professional Basketball team out in Sacramental California (NBA) San Jose Earthquakes – San Jose California Professional Soccer Team (MLS) Save the Children - Global charity organization Sears - Clothing and household products, electronic store Seoclerks. com – Get SEO work done on your site cheap SFU bookstore - Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada Shopify. com – An online store that allows anyone to sell their products ShopJoy – An Australian online retailer that sells novelty and unique gifts SimplePay - Nigeria’s most popular web and mobile-based wallet service Square – Payment processor that help small businesses accept credit cards using iPhone, Android or iPad State Republican Party – First State Republican Party to accept bitcoin donations Straub Auto Repairs - 477 Warburton Ave, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706 - (914) 478-1177 Stripe - San Francisco-based payments company Subway – Eat fresh Suntimes. com – Chicago based online newspaper T-Mobile Poland – T-Mobile’s Poland-based mobile phone top-up company Target – An American retailing company TechCrunch. com – IT blog Tesla – The car company The Libertarian Party – United States political party The Pink Cow – A diner in Tokyo, Japan The Pirate Bay - BitTorrent directories TigerDirect – Major electronic online retailer Victoria’s Secret – A lingerie outlet Virgin Galactic - Richard Branson company that includes Virgin Mobile and Virgin Airline World tourism- Group of 1560 Tour agencies worldwide. WebJet – Online travel agency Whole Foods – Organic food store (by purchasing gift card from Gyft) with your money, for free! Wikipedia - The Free Encyclopedia with 4 570 000+ article WordPress – An online company that allows user to create free blogs Yacht- base – Croatian yacht charter company Zappos – Online retailer Zynga – Mobile gaming
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Silicon Valley Startup Lets Users Move Money Without Government Interference By Turning Their Phones Into Stand-Alone Banks

This is an automatic summary, original reduced by 97%.
Bill Barhydt: Abra is a money transfer service that allows people to use their own smartphone to send money between any two phone numbers in the world in real time.
Now if you use a custodial bitcoin wallet, like Zappo or Coinbase, when you move money between their users, the bitcoin never leaves Coinbase.
Jim Epstein: And getting being able to do international money transfer through phones, which is, moving money through phones is clearly where we're headed, that's the future.
Meaning, if I have cash in my pocket and I want to put that money on my phone to send it, how do I get it on the phone in the first place? Right? If I'm using my bank account to get that money on the phone, how am I doing that in a way that's legal that the government will allow versus something that they would consider to be an illegal money transfer, for example?
What Abra has done is we've separated the business of storing and moving the money between Abra apps and the process by which you get the money on and off the Abra app in the first place.
If you're already a bitcoin user, you can just push the money into Abra like you can by sending money between two bitcoin wallets.
Summary Source | FAQ | Theory | Feedback | Top keywords: money#1 Abra#2 bitcoin#3 Epstein#4 Jim#5
Post found in /Bitcoin, /BitcoinAll and /TheBlogFeed.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
submitted by autotldr to autotldr [link] [comments]

Counterpoint: Send the press release NOW! Should've been done ages ago. RELEASE THE KRAKEN!!!!!

I understand where VertFan is coming from, but as the person who drafted the original press release and as someone who has a desire to see this alt succeed (and who was planning to increase my Vertcoin usage), we need to send out the press release.
We're 3 months old, and when you search for us on Google News, almost nothing comes up, and nothin' in the last month. Very bad sign for any potential investor scoping us out, and it is the reason why I am not ALREADY increasing my own usage or buys of this coin - I don't want to be a champion for a coin that is PR socially awkward bird, which Vertcoin is increasingly coming across as (sorry to be harsh).
This coin has a very good reputation within the crypto and mining communities. It has a great algorithm, great developers, a good name and common sense branding, and the zero pre-mine is sexytime.
I know a lot about press releases and getting media from my background. The press will not make the Vertcoin story about our price, especially since that's not the focus of the release, and especially since we are holding up VERY well price wise in comparison to nearly every other coin on coinmarketcap.
The sooner we decouple from Bitcoin, the better. We don't want to be the little sucker fish stuck onto the shark that you've probably seen on Animal Planet. It rides along with the shark, cleans its gills, and in exchange the shark ignores it.
We want to be the giant squid deep below the ocean's waves. Giant squid don't clean no one's gills. In fact, a shark is probably viewed as a tasty little snack.
The press will make the story about there being a new coin out there, with a different algorithm, that is attracting different kinds of miners for its network -- and this is leading to a more fair, secure coin. The press is also aware that, in most industries and ventures, the 3rd generation is the charm. This is the case with rocket design (listen to Elon Musk's epic TED Talk), it's the case with electronics and it's the case with crypto, I believe.
If a reporter has an editor who tells them to make it about price and to frame this coin as "risky," then that will be the story -- regardless of the time we send out the release.
We need to have some confidence. Even a fraction of the confidence and self-assurance and loud mouths that the shibes have. From a technical/investment standpoint, we have a much better coin than them, yet we can't even muster the balls to send out a release or bother some merchants with mass emails to get us on their radar?
We should send out ten press releases, because to hell with the press. Even the worst possible coverage would be better than what we are receiving now -- nothing. A terrible narrative can be discussed and improved over time. No narrative takes you nowhere.
Even a CNN Money article suggesting that those who invest in Vertcoin will be eaten by the Mothman would be better than "0 results found."
When I'm out at dinner with friends, as I was recently, and they ask me what I'm interested in lately -- much easier to sell them on Vertcoin if I can just send them a link to a Forbes or TechCrunch article, instead of a 2 month old blogspot link where Vertcoin is mentioned just as an aside regarding ASICs in the future.
This community needs to get noisy. It's noise that will make me more confident about this coin's future. I like companies I've heard people say something about before. Groupon. Zappos. Uber. ...and with some noise... Vertcoin.
Vertans, shield up. For tonight we dine in HELL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Send the releases. Send the emails. Cross post the links. Plenty of time to be shy or mysterious later on.
Our price is SOLELY a function of demand. We generate 28,800 new coins per day. Of that, most are hoarded by miners in anticipation of a future rise in price. Conservatively, we need static demand of at least 8,000 to 9,000 new coins per day for price to stay the same. And if demand spikes above that, price rises as well.
A certain percentage of all people who find out about Vertcoin BUY some Vertcoin. This is mathematical fact. As we increase the size of the "people who are now aware of Vertcoin" pool, the number of buyers and users necessarily increases, which necessarily moves us further and further above that 8,000 coin break-even.
disclaimer: some serious bar napkin math in the last 2 paragraphs
submitted by CryptoDonDraper to vertcoin [link] [comments]

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