Bitcoin Mining Guide - Getting started with Bitcoin mining

I'm looking for people who want to earn some extra money! Getting started is simple, install the browser and use it on a daily basis. It's fast and it's made easy to find and handy to browse, so you gonna love it! But the main thing is that you can mine Bitcoins right in it! Don't hesitate and join!

submitted by Pacmale to gotrich [link] [comments]

10-17 18:13 - 'Hey guys, I just found this new amazing cloud mining, it has been 2 weeks since I started this and I am getting a positive ROI after 10 days!! Hit the link below if you want to learn more about this super handy metho...' (i.redd.it) by /u/ian6531 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 1-11min

Hey guys, I just found this new amazing cloud mining, it has been 2 weeks since I started this and I am getting a positive ROI after 10 days!! Hit the link below if you want to learn more about this super handy method to get coins https://goo.gl/LZiQTz
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: ian6531
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Handy bitcoin mining calculator

Following is a link to a bitcoin calculator in Excel that I have been improving and maintaining for some time now. It is based on an original model created by the folks at Bitmain. The historical data is current as of the last difficulty change.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1DkFD-cfVr4d2NkV2hyWTE2NVk/edit?usp=sharing
I hope you find it useful.
PM me with any question or enhancement requests.
submitted by Und3rd0g02 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

[Paracosm Discord] Hans's Inspiring Conv: Tangle Inside

2/6
Disclaimer:
This is my editing, so there could be some misunderstandings.
Anyone who wants to read everything should go to the 'spec' of Paracosm discord.
IMHO, Hans's philosophy and motivation is worth sharing widely.



Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 7:57
People are more motivated then ever

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:02
the point is that the IF is not going to be there forever - its not meant to
having a self sustainable ecosystem is very important for the maturity of the protocol

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:03
No it's not
if IF would cease to exist tomorrow - it would be finished by the people working for the IF anyway
I am 100% sure
and if i would have to do it alone ...

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:05
we can all do it together - and we are actually doing it already
hornet and goshimmer have VERY close ties
they are really good friends and very capable coders
its an honor to work with them

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:06
[when do you reckon the shift to binary will take place?]
its being merged in goshimmer tomorrow :smile:

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:14
[about Multiverse]
the last statements of popov was that it "might work"
he still has some concerns
i guess he still tends to think the chances of it not working as bigger than the chances of it working
I am 100% sure it works - but maybe its on me to prove that with a fully functional prototype.

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:17
My goal is to show a prototype being able to process 10 million tps by the mid of this year - we will see if I can pull this off
maybe time will be rare, considering the parallel work on coordicide
maybe I should aim for end of 2020 instead

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:19
of course it includes sharding
that whole point of IOTA is sharding
and a completely new form of sharding

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:19
[why 10m TPS?]
its just a random number
some kind of goal post
so you can process the entirety of bitcoins history in 1minute and 30 seconds?
would be a nice thing

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:21
coordicide and multiverse would essentially use the same sharding principles
I hope that we can share more on that soon
Oh its quite concrete
we are starting to write math papers about it already

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:23
FPC is perfectly fine for sharding
you have to forget the discrete sharding world of blockchains where you just make n copies of the same thing
its very different


Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:30
I would LOVE to share that with you but maybe just wait a but longer - we will be more open about this pretty soon
let's just say that we still have some aces in our sleeves

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:49
nope
I am completely new in crypto but I am pretty sure that some people might "know me from before"
if they would know what I did before

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 8:57
dude the IF has reached a stage where it would survive without anbybody
I could drop dead tomorrow and the IF would continue, same goes for David or anybody else

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:00
all the corporates and everything ... it might not be fully reflected in the price yet but IOTA has a really really bright future

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:01
I think we are starting to see a pretty bullish sentiment around IOTA lately
I only hope that its due to our increased transparency with a clear roadmap and everyhting, and not just some random fluke in the prices
It would just feel much more "rewarding" to be a consequence of our efforts :joy:

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:05
i am buying more IOTA every month : was very happy about the low prices
but I can understand that if you just "have to believe" and have no insight about the actual progress, then these prices can feel more concerning than a "bargain"

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:13
Do you really expect a guy working on IOTA to not be bullish about the tech and everything?
I am not in IOTA for the moneyzzz

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:18
if you are asking for investment advice, then I am most probably the worst person to ask
as my trades in crypto have always been horrible

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:20
I didn't have the chance to be around in the ICO days so I need to take what's left

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:27
I don't know man - everybody that I know is not willing to sell

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:35
Yassin is the proof that "reputation" is worth something
A man of honor - my deepest respect to you man
People who stick to their word and can be trusted are sadly a rare thing in today's world

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:39
I anyway think that we have way too much tribalism in crypto
people should really stop praising "people and projects" and instead start to praise ideas and concepts

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:43
I mean I get the whole concept of having a single currency and shit, but if the tech is bad? I mean this is the first time in the history of humans that we can "design" the very foundation of our social and economical layer
why would we not go for the best available tech?
bitcoin was "a breakthrough" when it was released
and it helped to kickstart a whole field of research
but its clearly not the best possible solution

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:47
ultimately the best tech will win
just look at bitcoins dominance
its fading long term
sure it was time for a correction from the 2017 run of alts

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:47
but the overall trend is pretty clear
bitcoins days are numbered

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:54
maybe I can leak one thing about IOTA's sharding solution without giving away too much: Every single node can individually decide how much data it wants to process - so you can have very very resource-constrained nodes like sensors and stuff in the same network as nodes with hundreds of cores and they will be able to work together seamlessly
there will essentially be no "minimum hardware requirements" for a node (of course you have "some" requirements to even be able to run some kind of logic)

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:56
We are on the forefront of research when it comes to VDF's but its not really related
VDFs would maybe be a way to replace PoW in the future as a rate control mechanism

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 9:58
you don't need big nodes
you can be as big as you want to be
but naturally some nodes will have more power than others

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:01
possible - the whole mana system is based on "reputation", if you run a reliable cluster of nodes that people are willing to use, then you can earn mana
and since mana decides how many transactions you can issue, you can of course "allow others to use your resources" for money
so operating a reliable node cluster could be sth that people might do "for a living" in the future
maybe it would be best to build up a reputation already today

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:03
if you have funds in the network, then you will generate more than enough mana to have enough "shares" in the network to use it
for free
but if anybody wants to just piggyback on the network without holding tokens, then he might have to pay a "fee"

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:05
if you want to send a lot of data transactions, then you better have some tokens
I mean its just fair, right?
you don't have any stake in the network but you wanna use it? then pay for it
but people who have funds in the network can use it for free

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:07
i think ultimately the community will provide a plugin for the nodes, where you can "automatically" rent your excess reputation for some income

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:08
[what would the income be ?]
tokens
IOTA

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:09
by the people who want to use the network more than what their token holding would allow them to
so they rent "mana" from the people who have it

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:10
the internet took off when flat-rate emerged
and prices became predictable
the same is true for crypto

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:11
thats why companies like IOTA so much ... it creates a platform that has "predictable" prices
any mining based crypto will never be able to offer the same
Beeing feeless is not just a "funny feature", its the key to mass adoption

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:14
If I run a node and have funds in the network, then why would I pay anybody anything? I am supporting the network already by using it

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:16
Yeah we are using "mana 2" now which is also the one that is implemented in the goshimmer mana package
the formulas are going to change a bit tho
we had like 16 different versions of mana with all very different implications on game theory and code

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:18
but serguei is the expert when it comes to game theory and we are pretty confident that we have chosen the correct survivor

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:19
[The mana implementation does seem like the slipperiest slope]
it uses a few economic theories from the early 20th century (from silvio gesell) by having smth like a "demurrage function"
so the rich dont get richer
its software - if any design decision turns out to be problematic, you patch it

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:20
[So it’s hard to maintain a high mana]
its not like you have to live with it for thousands of years like in our current FIAT system
if you make it right from the start, the rich will never become that powerful that they could even dare to fork

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:22
you are "RENTING" out your excess resources
that doesn't mean that you will broadcast everything unseen
If somebody tries to use your node to perform an attack you will just ignore it
of course you might "lose the fees" that they would be willing to pay you to perform this attack,
but ultimately you will have to decide what is more valuable to you
the few cents of IOTA you earn or your "reputation / mana"

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:25
the nodes will perform all of the sanity checks, so they don't "accidently" take part in an attack of course
the point is that its a voting system based on mana
if I use your node to "issue a transaction",
then I maybe pay you for issuing this tx
but your "opinion on that tx" is independent of that

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:29
actually I even think that the whole coordicide principles especially in connection with the sharding are very much in line with cfb's initial vision - and I am actually a bit sad that he never really dared to honestly look into them

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:29
I was even thinking about "naming" the multiverse "cfbs vision" once
maybe its more (pauls's vision) than cfbs vision
paul handy was one of the other early developers of IOTA btw.
and a very very smart person I have to say
a lot of the ideas that we are currently pursuing go back to his line of thinking

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:32
the infamous "ontology principles"
the ultimate goal is to be able to run "anything" on the tangle - not just value transfers but literally anything, event remotely related to DLT's
I envision IOTA being a general purpose DLT platform
pretty much like TCP/IP was for the internet

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:36
I introduced "broadcasts" a few days ago as a new concept that is the equivalent of UDP messages

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:49
I think that one of the things where cfb and me disagree regarding the "vision of IOTA" is that he think thats we should "finalize" the protocol as soon as possible (or "set it in stone" as he likes to call it), so hardware manufacturer can start to build hardware, whereas I think that it makes much more sense for it to be something like an "open evolving standard" that is so flexible that you can literally build whatever the fuck you want based on this protocol.

The internet wouldn't have been the internet, if it would have "just" been for sending scientific messages between researchers.
I can not anticipate and know what humans might do with DLT in the future, so limiting myself to "only value transfers" is IMHO the wrong decision.
for something to be successful, it needs to be able to "model" everything that could possibly exist

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:51
IOTA will be able to run "anything" on top of it - even "virtual instances of other cryptocurrencies"
and its not going to be some quirky slow emulation - it would most probably even be faster and more reliable than when being implemented without it

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:52
similar to "INTEL inside" you will most probably see sth like "Tangle inside" soon

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:54
"any application" running on top of the tangle (MAM, DID, Qubic, Matrix ... you name them) would ALWAYS have to be able to process IOTA value transfers
THAT's what will give the token a value

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:55
if everybody can already "speak the same language" anyway, then people will also use that language to communicate
which means that people will use the IOTA token to transfer value
so we don't need to "force ourselves" on others - they will come by themselves
because its the only thing that makes sense

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 10:57
[so Hans, $10 EOY still ?]
if btc stays where it is?
hard to achieve i'd say
most probably not
it always takes some time for people to "wake up"
dunno maybe it goes fast
most weak hands are gone in IOTA

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:00
But seriously guys ... the price of course is interesting but if we are able to pull this off, then this will be the start of a new form of society
it will affect everything
the way we interact .... even the way we behave towards each other
I am not even sure if you need to be "rich" in that kind of society
Star trek sounds like a nice vision


Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:20
[once IOTA is completely implemented, its gonna be a matter of energy consumption optimization race I guess?]
ultimately, yes
whatever crypto is going to be the "cheapest" one to "operate" will win

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:22
BUT that is at the same time "expressive" enough to not have "niches" for weird competitors, that claim to be even a "little bit better" in one of the aspects
it needs to be the best possible solution that humans are most probably able to come up with

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:23
if even the smallest something can be improved, then it should become part of the core rather than a competing project
not having miners and being able to "upgrade" whenever it is necessary, is what will give IOTA power
not setting stuff in stone today

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:29
I guess what fascinates me the most about IOTA is that people have a different kind of philosophy - in crypto people are usually sharing the mindset of "let's destroy the banks ... or .... the FED ... or whoever they consider to be their enemy
IOTA for me is not so much about "destroying somebody else" rather than "creating something new"

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:30
But the "mindset and motivation" makes all the difference
And I feel like large parts of the community "understand and share" that vision

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:34
there are plenty of "problems" where DLT is not the right answer
but there are most probably also quite a few that we haven't even thought about, yet
that go way beyond just "finance"

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:38
[Has IF any plans for anonymous transactions Hans?]
it's current not our main point of research but I would say ultimately yes
the fact thats its feeless make "mixing" funds a very feasible solution
But even on top of that (like zero knowledge proofs and stuff) If there is a use case, then you should be able to do it with IOTA.
that's what I mean with "general purpose DLT" platform
whatever is possible should be doable with the protocol - not "just" IoT value transfers

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:42
everything you could most probably think of
the same way as TCP/IP allows you to play computer games, send emails, or watch streams

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오전 11:48
tomorrow I start merging the first ledger-related stuff into the development branch
from the outside it will most probably look like any other day : but starting to work on the "final version" which is supposed to be ready end of Q1 is a big milestone for us
2 months left

Hans Moog [IF]어제 오후 12:04
100% agree - let's finish this shit!
we have "talked" for quite a while - the coming months, we will have to show what we "have"
submitted by btlkhs to Iota [link] [comments]

04-03 12:33 - 'Paul Le Roux' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/financeoptimum removed from /r/Bitcoin within 191-201min

'''
Paul Le Roux is a fascinating character, whose story entails drugs, gold, arms dealing, North Koreans, Iranians, elite-level encryption, Somali pirates, women...and more women.
Let's get into it...
Part 1/5 - The Early Years
Paul Le Roux was born on Christmas Eve, 1972, in Bulawayo, the second-largest city in what was then called—by the white minority that governed it, at least— Rhodesia.
In 1980, Robert Mugabe became prime minister of what would now be called Zimbabwe, ending minority white rule in the country.
Four years later, when Le Roux was 12, the family relocated to South Africa.
Not long after the move, in exchange for washing his father’s car, Le Roux was given his first computer. After that, a relation of Le Roux states that he became "completely anti-social.”
When Le Roux was 15 or 16, in the late 1980s, the local police raided the family home and arrested Paul for selling pornography. After that, Le Roux turned even more inward.
Although he was an excellent student, he despised the idea of learning Afrikaans, which was compulsory in South African schools, describing it as "a dead language" that he "didn't want to learn."
At 16, he dropped out of high school and decided to follow his interest in computers, taking a local programming course.
Family lore has it that after he spent one class explaining some technical fact to the teacher, he got a letter saying he no longer needed to attend. He then completed a year’s worth of material in eight weeks!
Accounts of Le Roux do indicate that he was exceptionally gifted, and people who worked with him described him as a genius.
After returning from a family holiday to Disneyland in the US, 17-year-old Le Roux decided to leave South Africa, and departed for the UK eight months later to work as a programmer.
He then moved from the UK to the US, where he lived in Virginia Beach.
After six months in the US, he followed his then-girlfriend Michelle to Australia in 1995. The couple married and Le Roux acquired Australian citizenship.
Le Roux frequented message boards and enjoyed trolling Australians. A typical post read:
"All of Australia could disappear into the Pacific and the only difference it would make to the World is the Americans would have one less pussy country to protect."
His posts caused outrage on the board - someone even changed their handle to fuck @ you.paul
Le Roux would later declare that his correspondents had fallen for his ploy:
"Australians are east to provoke and your postings (including 2 death threats, numerous flames, and one guy who swears he has my address & phone number) have provided me with hours of amusement."
Of course, Le Roux did more than just troll Australian message boards in this period...
Le Roux had started building E4M - Encryption for the Masses - in 1997, releasing it at the end of 1998.
Part 2/5 - The Turning Point
E4M allowed users to encrypt entire hard drives, and to conceal the existence of encrypted files (such that prying eyes wouldn't even know they were there).
According to Le Roux, the software was written from scratch, with thousands of hours going into its development and testing.
As well as this, in the [Politics section of the E4M website]1 , Le Roux published a sort of Manifesto, describing how "governments are increasingly relying on electronic data gathering" and how "Strong Encryption is the mechanism with which to combat these intrusions, preserve your rights, and guarantee your freedoms into the information age and beyond."
In the spirit of the open-source software movement in the late 90s, Le Roux released E4M for free and made the code available for other people to improve.
Therefore, with no income from his two years of labor, he was struggling financially. His marriage fell apart violently and the couple got divorced in 1999.
Le Roux first relocated to Hong Kong, then to Rotterdam in the Netherlands. He married a Dutch citizen named Lilian, and they had a child shortly after.
In 2000, in order to monetize E4M, Le Roux launched [SW Professionals]2 in 2000.
Based in South Africa, the company offered offshore programming, including E4M customization.
One of Le Roux's clients was an Italian telecoms engineer called Wilfried Hafner, who had corresponded with Le Roux for several years about E4M.
Hafner had founded a company to create a commercial encryption product that would combine some of the elements of E4M with another piece of software, Scramdisk. The new company would be called SecurStar, and its product would be called DriveCrypt.
Hafner hired Le Roux to build DriveCrypt's underlying engine.
At the time, Le Roux was desperate for money - he drove a beat up car and worked out of a Rotterdam apartment small enough that, on the phone, Hafner could often hear a baby crying in the background.
Hafner on the other hand was living in the South of France, and Le Roux openly coveted the kind of success that he imagined led to such a home. He told Hafner: "I am ambitious, I want to have all this."
However, in the middle of the development work for DriveCrypt, Hafner discovered that Le Roux was still working on E4M and had incorporated some of his work for SecurStar into his personal project. As a result, Hafner terminated Le Roux's contract.
By October 2002, SW Professionals was now defunct and Le Roux was openly soliciting for work on the alt.security.scramdisk forum.
It was around this time that Le Roux received some news that "shattered his whole world."
In 2002, he travelled to Zimbabwe to retrieve a copy of his birth certificate.
On the trip, his aunt and uncle pulled him aside to tell him the truth, and it was then that Le Roux found out he was adopted.
Although many family members had known for years, Le Roux’s parents had elected to keep him in the dark about it.
It was the "unknown" part that hurt him the most.
Shortly after, Le Roux appeared on an another set of message boards - he seemed to be launching some kind of moneymaking scheme that required opening a company based in the U.S.
In 2004, a group of anonymous developers did exactly what Hafner had feared: they released a new and powerful, free file-encryption program, called TrueCrypt, built on the code for E4M.
TrueCrypt combined security and convenience, giving users the ability to strongly encrypt files or entire disk drives while continuing to work with those files as they would a regular file on their computer.
Hafner and his SecurStar colleagues suspected that Le Roux was part of the TrueCrypt collective but couldn't prove it.
As we'll explore in Part 5, TrueCrypt is an interesting part of this story...
Part 3/5 - Money and Power
After Le Roux's departure from the encryption world, at least under his own name, he entered the Internet-pharmacy business.
What Le Roux did next was combine two of America's favourite past times, popping pills and online shopping, and the results were sensational. He turned over around $300MM in 4 years.
In 2007, Le Roux moved his family to Manila, where he would base his operations. He also had call centres in Israel. This was a brilliant move by Le Roux, as the authorities were not looking at Tel Aviv and Jerusalem as hot-spots for a large-scale organised crime operation...
Le Roux was moving serious volume during this time - his operation was once one of FedEx's largest customers.
A relative of Le Roux pointed to 2008 or 2009 as the point at which Le Roux snapped.
"I think the money got to him. I personally saw $100 million in his office in Makati. Cash, bud. It was fucking ridiculous. It was in wicker baskets lined up on the side of the wall in his office."
Le Roux's appetite only grew, and not just in the literal sense (he was known as the "Fat Man" in the Philippines): he wanted to be a different kind of businessman, a lord of the real underworld, not just the virtual one.
An Israeli associate of Le Roux tells how "Le Roux wanted to make more money, fast. Le Roux wanted to diversify, to be bigger. The only way to do that was illegal. He was living inside a movie, you could almost say."
As well as this, Le Roux was notorious for his sexual exploits - he once wrote to his cousin, "15-20 a week, sometimes 3 per night."
A former call centre employee tells how Le Roux approached him with an assignment, which at first he thought was collecting women for Le Roux to open a bar. However, that was not the reason, as Le Roux explained:
"I'm going to impregnate them, and build an army of kids."
Le Roux asked him to make a spreadsheet to track the women: their names, dress size, age, medical checkups. The operation was given top priority by Le Roux, who even sent his emissary to China to try to find women there.
It is rumoured that Le Roux has at least 11 children to 7 different women!
Le Roux's businesses expanded into logging, precious metals mining, gold smuggling, land deals, cocaine shipping, and arms dealing. These activities were spread across dozens of shell companies registered all over the world.
Of course, he needed to launder the money. Le Roux used paid muscle in Hong Kong to swap cash for gold bars, and then proceeded to stash the gold in warehouses in Hong Kong (this totalled around $50MM).
Speaking of paid muscle, Le Roux had plenty: ex-soldiers and mercenaries made sure any problems were dealt with force if necessary.
Le Roux was closest to ex-British soldier Dave Smith, who would act as the leader of the mercenaries and allow Le Roux to insulate himself and not have to deal with people. In fact, Le Roux once told Smith "I live vicariously through you."
However, things took a turn for the worse, at least from Dave Smith's perspective, as Smith stole $5MM worth of Gold from Le Roux.
Le Roux was furious. He then summoned Smith to his place in the country, and asked him to dig a hole as they needed to stash some gold. However, when he arrived, he was greeted by a South African hit-man. After the hit-man had finished shooting Smith, Le Roux then grabbed the gun and fired into Smith's corpse.
Le Roux then set about building an arms base in Somalia.
To achieve this, Le Roux called upon an ex-soldier from Europe, code-named 'Jack' to work for him on the ground in Somalia.
At sea, Jack had to bribe Somali pirates.
It was actually this activity in Somalia that landed Le Roux on the radar of the DEA, as he popped up in a UN Report on security in Somalia.
The DEA were now on his tail. Of course, his encryption skills came in handy - Le Roux's thick layers of encryption meant that the DEA needed someone on the inside...
Part 4/5 - "Well played gentlemen, well played"
Le Roux was getting more and more paranoid about people in his organisation stealing from him. Without justification, he suspected that his self proclaimed 'Golden Boy' Jack was stealing from him - so he ordered a hit on Jack.
This was a huge mistake on Le Roux's part, as Jack then called a CIA hotline and went on the run. It was 18 months later that a DEA investigating Le Roux found Jack's message to the CIA. The DEA agent then called Jack. Scared for his life, Jack agreed to turn informant.
In the meantime, Le Roux then had a change of heart and apologised to Jack for ordering the hit on him. The DEA then asked Le Roux to go back to work for Le Roux - they now had someone on the inside.
To tempt Le Roux, the DEA devised a sting operation. They knew that Le Roux wanted novelty and excitement. So they fabricated the scenario that Jack had made contact with a high profile Colombian trafficker, and the Colombians wanted to bypass the Mexicans for their meth supply in the US.
Le Roux was hooked. However, the DEA needed to lure Le Roux out of Manila, as his network of corrupt officials would ensure he will never be arrested.
Jack needed to get Le Roux to Liberia (where the DEA had a trusted ally in Fombah Sirleaf, Head of Liberia's National Security Agency).
Jack achieved this by saying that they needed to meet a cartel representative to finalise the deal.
It worked, and Le Roux was arrested. Initially, Le Roux went into passive resistance - he was a big unit (hence the nickname "Fat Man") - and it took around 10 agents to get him on the plane to fly back to the US.
Well he settled on the plane, the first thing Le Roux said to the DEA agents was: "Well played gentlemen, well played."
He then said: "If you're looking at me, then clearly you're looking at bigger things..."
The DEA agents were intrigued: "No Paul, you're the prize - what could possibly be bigger than you?"
Le Roux responded: "Nation states gentlemen, nation states."
He then started to spew out extremely valuable information on North Korea and Iran.
Of course, this wasn't the only leverage Le Roux had...
The enforcers who were once on Le Roux's payroll needed to be held accountable for their numerous murders, and the DEA were desperate to get them behind bars. Le Roux was key in their eventual capture. But that's not all: a crucial piece to this story is Part 5...
Part 5/5 - TrueCrypt
As we discussed previously, Le Roux was rumoured to be a member of the TrueCrypt collective.
In November 2012, a man with the online handle Cincinnatus decided to throw a party in Hawaii. The idea arose out of an email exchange with Runa Sandvik, a developer and expert on the online software Tor, which allows its users to mask the physical location of their computers on the Internet.
After she gave a Tor tutorial on Reddit, Cincinnatus sent Sandvik an encrypted message. Cincinnatus told Sandvik that he lived in Hawaii. Sandvik mentioned that she would be there on vacation the following month and could give a talk on Tor.
Cincinnatus suggested they host a “cryptoparty,” a phenomenon that had arisen around that time among technology- and privacy-conscious activists. The date was set for December 11.
Unbeknownst to Sandvik, her fellow party planner was hatching a much more elaborate education scheme. Four days after he contacted Sandvik, Cincinnatus sent an email to the journalist Glenn Greenwald. “The security of people’s communications is very important to me,” he wrote. In a series of emails, he suggested that Greenwald set up an encrypted means by which sources could contact him.
Cincinnatus organized the cryptoparty at a hacker space called HiCapacity, located in the back of a furniture store in Honolulu.
When Sandvik arrived around 6 p.m., Cincinnatus introduced himself as Ed and told her that he worked at the computer-hardware company Dell.
Ed kicked off the evening by welcoming the attendees, then invited Sandvik to give her presentation on Tor. When she was finished, Ed pulled out his laptop, plugged it into the projector, and began his own instructional talk about TrueCrypt. In Ed’s presentation, Sandvik later wrote, he “pointed out that while the only known name associated with TrueCrypt is someone in the Czech Republic, TrueCrypt is one of the best open-source solutions available.”
Six months later, in June 2013, Greenwald and filmmaker Laura Poitras published the first of a series of articles that grew out of their contact with Cincinnatus.
In time they revealed that his full name was Edward Snowden, that he had worked in various capacities at the National Security Agency, and that he had downloaded and handed over a trove of documents from the NSA in an effort to blow the whistle on what he believed were egregious privacy encroachments by the U.S. government.
Among them was a document revealing that TrueCrypt was one of a small number of encryption programs that had withstood the NSA’s efforts to crack it.
What Snowden and the rest of the world wouldn’t know for another two years was that Paul Le Roux, the man whose code formed the foundation of True Crypt, was at that very moment in the custody of the U.S. government. Le Roux was in a bind, facing the full force of a U.S. federal prosecution for any number of his extraordinary array of crimes. The only way out was to spill his secrets...
[[link]4
'''
Paul Le Roux
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: financeoptimum
1: e4m.net/**l*ht*l 2: e4m*net* 3: www.yout*be.co*/watc**v=z**aMoJ**k* 4: www.youtube.com/watc*?v*z*Za*o***kc**^*
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Years of Searching: Found Bitcoin Wallet. Data File Missing. Possible Conspiracy?

I sold a lot of runescape gold for bitcoin back in 2010/2011 as a young teenager. I also did a bit of mining. I can't remember the exact amount, but I believe I had around 500 bitcoin in 2011. At the time, it was only worth a few hundred dollars, which was still a lot for me back then. It was my pride and joy. At some point in 2011, my harddrive corrupted and my computer was inaccessible. I paid a hundred or so dollars at best buy to get it fixed. They were unable to do so. I searched the internet for answers to no avail. My birthday came around and I got a new laptop. I kinda just called the old laptop a complete loss. In 2012 I moved off for college. I honesly wasn't even thinking about bitcoin that entire year. That was until my second semester in college, the tail end of 2012. Bitcoin was soaring. Word was getting around that it was at $10/btc. At the time, this was actually huge. A lot of people started cashing out here, believe it or not. It was at this time that I remembered the old laptop. The bitcoin I had was now worth around $5k. I still had no idea how to recover it, but I knew I needed to get that laptop when I went back home. I go home for the holidays and ask about it. My parents had cleaned up house and said they threw it away as they thought it was broken. I was heartbroken. As a broke college student, that $5k was gonna really come in handy. I basically signed that bitcoin off completely after that. It was confirmed trashed.
Fast forward a few years. Christmas 2017. Bitcoin is soaring out of control. Now at $15k/btc. Everyone is talking about it. It became a topic at the dinner table. I told everyone about how I once had 500 BTC but it was lost on an old, corrupted, laptop that was thrown away. My dad is fantasizing about how rich we'd be now. He was very frustrated at the idea of literally throwing it away. It was at this point my sister's husband says that my dad gave him a laptop amongst other old electronics back then and that he thinks he still has it. We literally ended the dinner right then and there as I demanded we drive to his house. We search all over to no avail. He thinks he might have actually thrown it away as well... The loss is felt all over again.
Fast forward. March 2020. Things really haven't worked out for me in life. I'm broke. I'm out of a job at the moment due to corona. Idk how I'm ever gonna get ahead. I have random nights where I beat myself up for not being smarter as a teen. Surely there was a simple solution to a corrupt harddrive. Why did I smoke so much damn weed? Why did my dad have to give it away? Why did my sister's husband have to throw it away? Whyyyyyyyy. My sister calls me. She says she found my laptop. Holy. Shit. I drive over and power it up at her house. It turns on flawlessly... Everything is there... All my files... No corrupt harddrive anymore... What the fuck... I open bitcoin. Error. I search through all the files. The wallet is missing. "Wallet.dat" is gone. "Wallet.cpp" and "wallet.h" are there, but not the data file. What the fuck is going on. There's no way my sister did anything, she is clueless with computers. Her husband is a web developer though... Maybe he fixed it and stole the wallet. Maybe that's why they've had a huge upgrade in their life in the past year... I ask my sister if her husband did anything and she says not that she knows of. Why would she tell me about it then? Surely she would know if her husband acquire millions in bitcoin? Was this her way of telling me without actually telling me? She knows I've fallen on tough times. Does she feel guilty? I confront her husband and he has no idea what I'm talking about. I feel like I'm acting crazy now. Was I hacked in the past and had my wallet stolen? Did the best buy person steal it? I seriously think it was her husband. As far as I know, he still works the same job, but they've bought a huge house, multiple cars, and lived a lavish lifestyle all in the past year.
I'm losing my mind here. My sister acts clueless. I feel like a crazy horrible person to even accuse them of doing that, but here I am... seriously questioning them now. I just don't know what to do from here. Do I call the police? I don't even know if I technically owned that bitcoin. I'm just so confused by everything right now. If her husband found the laptop in 2017 and cashed out, he would have made at least $7 million. That's enough to make ANYONE turn slimy. Hell, part of me doesn't even blame him. I just want to know what the fuck happened. It is driving me absolutely insane.
Does anyone have any advice here? And if, by chance, said husband reads this, if you stole the btc just give me some sign to ease my mind. Anything. I just want to know. If you didn't steal it, I'm sincerely sorry, but I hope you understand why I would accuse you.
submitted by 123848912384 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Tell us about your favourite Bitcoin tools

Hey guys,
Wanted to see which are you favourite Bitcoin tools, sites, etc today?
Wanted to update this post for 2020 with more of the best Bitcoin tools and sites on it (https://gocryptowise.com/blog/ultimate-list-of-handy-crypto-tools-sites-2019/)
Right now these are the current ones:
  1. The Halvening – A site dedicated to the upcoming halving event of Bitcoin. Where mining rewards will be halved (https://www.thehalvening.com/)
  2. Simple Bitcoin converter – Is a simple Bitcoin price converter to Fiat currencies… (http://preev.com/)
  3. 1ML – Is a Lightning Network Search and Analysis Engine (https://1ml.com/)
  4. Bitnodes – Lists and maps all the active nodes in the Bitcoin network around the world (https://bitnodes.earn.com/)
  5. Bitcoin Fee tool – A Bitcoin fee calculator and estimation tool (https://www.buybitcoinworldwide.com/fee-calculato)
submitted by polagon to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Earn via Browsing

Hi there! I'm looking for people who want to earn some extra money! Getting started is very simple, just install the browser Sign up and use it on a daily basis. It's fast and it's made easy to find and handy to browse, so you gonna love it! But the main thing is that you can mine Bitcoins right in it! Sounds good? Don't hesitate and join! 100% legit and free. Check out the website: link
submitted by lelos9 to Makemoneyonlinewithme [link] [comments]

Mine via Browsing

Hi there! I'm looking for people who want to earn some extra money! Getting started is very simple, just install the browser https://cryptotabbrowser.com/7183280 and use it on a daily basis. It's fast and it's made easy to find and handy to browse, so you gonna love it! But the main thing is that you can mine Bitcoins right in it! Sounds good? Don't hesitate and join! 100% legit and free. Check out the website: https://cryptotabbrowser.com/en/50/7183280/
payment proof
submitted by lelos9 to ReferralsForPay [link] [comments]

My Actual Advice For Getting A Job After TEFL

Starting a life after teaching abroad is the sour end note to most people's expat days. When I left the US for Asia in the early 2010s, the typical options for what to do after were:
  1. Go home, try to find a job, fail, go back to Korea
  2. Indefinite underemployment, followed by a delayed career path
  3. Not going home. Ever.
And realistically, the options haven't changed. Making any kind of career shift is tough, especially since TEFL isn't known for its adaptability to the corporate world. The three main pathways remain, though a few offshoots have cropped up.
The way the business world works has changed since earlier in the decade. With the economy stronger and the technology advancing, you can make a more seamless switch to a new career if you know what you're doing.
All this advice comes from my own experience, and from the stories of other former teachers who also made it out. When you talk to them about their past lives, they always talk about it with a certain relief, warmly, though obvious glad they don't have to go back to it.
I hope you get to feel that sense of relief someday as well.
1. Pick A Skill
Being a decent teacher is probably a skill, but it doesn't mirror neatly with any other job. If your time abroad did actually improve your public speaking, group management, and ability to order soju with your fingers, you'd have to show that to an employer. Just writing them on a resume makes the recruitment AI tosses your CV in the recycling bin.
You're going to have to build another talent. Learning to code is the common answer; common answers aren't what we're looking for. If your dream is to code then you probably already had a yen for it before you left. You don't need me to tell you how cool Node.js is.
More likely, perhaps, is that your major is curséd, marred with some profitless word like 'history' or 'linguistics.' Don't fret too much - most people didn't learn anything in university. Even the STEM majors!
Whatever you did prior to getting paid in foreign currency needs to be reviewed. Mine your previous interests for something profitable. College journalist? Congratulations, you write blog posts now. Art major? Better plunk down for that Adobe subscription. Don't spin the TEFL stuff too much. People can tell.
The odds of finding a job are actually in your favor, provided you can do something people want.
2. Know Where To Look
Most of the people I've known who've successfully 'come back' work in start-ups. The work environments are fairly similar to English academies, and the relative lack of experience isn't as notable as with enterprise companies.
To figure out what you need to learn, check listings on angel.co and indeed.com. The programs, skill sets, and requirements written in job ads are basically your checklists. You don't need to pull off everything, especially if it'd cost you money or time - i.e. another degree. Work with what you have.
My biggest asset in pivoting to a career as a writer was my portfolio. I hadn't done any professional writing since college, but after 5 years of teaching I'd improved somewhat anyway. I started taking gigs on Upwork, then eventually found clients in person as I traveled.
(you always travel for a while after you finish teaching. It's not unemployment - it's an adventure!)
Being able to show my work created a snowball effect for freelance gigs and, eventually, my full-time job. While my portfolio was (and is) more vital than my resume, there's one way to find opportunity that trumps both combined:
3. Network. Network. Network.
The best part about finding a TEFL job is the absolute 0% effort you need to put in. You can spend 10 minutes on Dave's and have a reasonable first-timer offer by the time the sun rises over Mt. Fuji.
Anyone who does more than a year or two of teaching will eventually realize networking is just as important in Seoul as it is in Seattle. Most TEFL jobs suck, and the people who stay somewhere for more than a year must at least tolerate it. (as with soju, beer, and garlic bread, tolerable is about as good as it gets.) There's high turnover at English schools (and startups, naturally), meaning every employee is on the lookout for new hires.
People want to work with people they've met before. Your PC bang pal would much rather sit next to you at work than a complete stranger who might not pass his piss test.
Closer friends can get you better gigs, but even a one-time acquaintance will put you up for something he thinks you won't fuck up.
4. Sustain Yourself.
All of the above can be done while you're teaching abroad. If you're out in the bumblefuck sticks somewhere like Hokkaido or Harbin or god forbid Guro-gu then your options for meeting people are more limited, and real world connections count much more than online ones.
Remember, though, that networking is technically step 3. While you should always keep yourself open to making new contacts, getting an offer is more likely when you're adept at the job description.
I want to tell you to work on yourself outside of teaching hours, whiling away at the craft you've picked. Python courses, Facebook Ad certifications, Mandarin language classes if you're still clinging to that dream. And it's a perfectly reasonable proposition: study hard, work at it, and people will take note of your skill.
The problem I have with this story - which is really only marginally different from my own - is that I've seen it fail more often than not. If you don't already have some buy-in on the career path you want, you'll probably just keep teaching.
For example: to move into professional writing, I made sure to highlight two internships I had in college - one as an editor, the other as a transcriptionist. Neither paid, nor did they contribute much to anything but my penmanship. My English degree, while narrow in utility, did come in handy as well.
The actual copywriting & content creation skills came later, but the reason I stuck with them is because I had the background. Coupled with what I taught myself, those minor resume assets I looked a lot sharper - like they were part of my development. The narrative you can tell about yourself means a lot; if TEFL is just a moment in your life out of many, you'll be more likely to find something new soon.
All of this is a very flowery way to state a simple fact: it's a lot easier to lean than it is to pivot. You may have to put a heavy polish on your customer service or PC building skills, but showing you can do it is the first step to going full-time. You'll also be more likely to stick with the job hunt - which will still probably take a while.
5. Keep Traveling
If you've read this far I'll assume a few things. You are:
With few connections to the rest of the world, you may feel untethered. My advice?
Keep traveling - at least for a while.
Cutting your life neatly from TEFL back to the real world nets you a massive culture shock. With no real basis for what you should be doing, you're stuck between being your old self and the person you are now, who doesn't fit anymore. You'll feel connected still to where you were, and disassociated from where you are.
This isn't meant to frighten you, and it doesn't happen to everyone. The feeling passes eventually, and it's sometimes the best call for certain people - particularly newlyweds who want the Western family support.
If you have the potential to go somewhere new, do it. Backpack throughout the nearby countries like you couldn't do on 2 weeks vacation. Take a volunteer position on a different continent. Make a go out of being a travel blogger, affiliate marketer, or bitcoin asshole.
Token attempts at a digital nomad field are actually some of the most fun to try. I'd encourage everyone to give it a shot - and former TEFL teachers are the best ones to do it. Networking is more challenging the more you move around, but you'll definitely meet a lot of people.
Having a good bit of money is obviously beneficial, just like it will always be forever. If you have enough USD to live decently, you have options. There are places you can live in Asia, South America, Africa, and Europe for less than $1000 a month.
Traveling, at least for a bit, can be hugely positive for your mental health. That's a big boost when you're working on getting back to a new career path. You don't want to let it turn into a resume gap, but hey - you've got that already. What's a few months?
6. Go Where The Jobs Are - Or Get Close.
I don't work in my home country. I will, someday, probably, though it's just as likely I'll go somewhere new.
The advantage to where I live now over Asia is time zones. The state of telecommuting has improved so much that as long as you're sharing daylight with your coworkers, you can basically work from anywhere. I go into the local office most days, but remote work is the strong thread connecting our team.
My opportunities as a writer weren't as plentiful in Asia as they are in the Occident. My income was stymied by a 13 hour time difference with clients, although this won't be true for everyone.
This has serious repercussions for where you choose to go. The worldwide start-up scene is doing well, though you're more likely to get hired where demand is high and supply is relatively low. Work visas are easier to get than you might think. This is where staying open comes in handy.
I'd really only recommend going back home if you have a job lead already. Otherwise, your experience working and living abroad can be an asset. HR knows you're used to the ups and downs of expat living, as well as the nature of being on an international team. It's not a huge boon, but it counts.
Another option is to look for a remote position. These are part of the many Catch-22s of job hunting: you have to have worked remotely before to get a remote job. It's not unheard of to go from TEFL to full-time remote, but it's not exactly easy either.
Volunteering and apprenticeships help, though they're a luxury when you need money. Real-world experiences in a place you'd like to live are the best for this. They'll connect you to other volunteers who can help find you gigs. Seriously - I can't stress how beneficial this was to me, both in terms of portfolio building and networking.
To fund all this, you could turn to the one thing guaranteed to make you money. It starts with VIP and ends with KID, but it really ends with you wondering why you ever listened to me.
Yes, teaching English online is a steady $20/hr income, and I know more people doing that than I do start-up employees. I continue to hope all of them are taking the advice I've never directly given them, as they teach English by night and work on job hunting by day. Most of them are just living day to day. That's fine - we all do, after all - but it's basically the same as teaching at a hagwon, and as hard to get out of the longer you rely on it. Make it work for you if you try it out.
7. Be Lucky.
Look, I've tried to make this comprehensive, sensible, and based on real world results. Even the smoothest transition out of TEFL is still going to be bumpy. There'll be times when you regret it all, times when you let yourself get overeager about a lead, times when you find yourself drifting through Dave's ESL Cafe, just thinking. Just a resume or two to China. You could do a year in China, right?
Yeah. You could always go back to teaching. That was in the back of my mind the entire year I spent wandering through the jobless muck. It still is, in fact - you never know what might change. Both the good and the bad are unpredictable.
Don't get discouraged. Be willing to change tactics when it's needed. None of my advice is iron clad, and most of it won't work for everyone. Maybe you need to be in a certain place, or a particular field, or by a certain date. Stay as flexible with your goals as you can without sacrificing your daily progress as a legitimate prospective employee.
It's not easy, but I swear to you - there are payoffs. If you go about this with the right attitude, every gig, every new acquaintance, every minor victory along the road to change is going to feel really, really good. And when you do get to a place to settle, you'll look back on it all and think - damn.
I'm really glad I didn't go to law school.
submitted by Kasigi_Yabu to TEFL [link] [comments]

how to make money by selling your daily photos

Making money online isn’t as simple as many think even though there are lots of ways one might do it, such as playing games, mining bitcoins, creating a YouTube channel, or just creating a blog. But the Internet allows much more than these methods, and that is to make money out of your hobbies. Computer builders can advertise their skills and make client builds, graphics specialists can make custom designs and sell them and the list goes on and on.
One hobby is quite common and and the possibility for getting fair compensation is quite high: photography. Be it digital photo manipulation or old school photography, those who have this hobby can sell their photos and make a pretty buck from it. Of course, your photos must be good if you want to sell them.

What types of photos can you sell?

Pretty much any type of digital media can be sold. If you own a quality camera, like a DSLR, you can take artistic photos or stock photos. There is a big market for stock photography, as digital artists use these photos to create others from them. Also, in the same category of stock photography are texture photographs, which can also be done with a high quality camera.
Note: Stock photography requires you to have a DSLR camera, as you need the high resolution provided by these devices. This is especially true for texture photography, where the textures need to be high resolution and high quality.
Artistic photography can also bring you some money, but there are many photographers out there that are very well known and take stunning pictures of all types (portraits, landscapes, nature, sports, macro, etc), and making a name for yourself is pretty hard, but if you are talented, then you will succeed.
Digital compositions can be sold in numerous places and graphics designers have made a living out of creating awesome photos from scratch or from stocks, using specialized software, such as Adobe Photoshop. If you don’t own a powerful camera, and you don’t like going out and searching for the best frame, then this might be the one for you. But keep in mind that programs like Photoshop are very hard to learn, and becoming proficient with them will take months if not years of hard work.

Selling photos online: Q&A

If you are just now starting to think about selling your photos, then you must have lots of questions. Here are a few answers that might interest you in the beginning:
Q: How much money can I make from selling photos? A: It greatly depends on how well your photos are discovered, how many you sell and what percentage of the cost of the photos you receive from the service you use.
Q: How long before I get any payment? A: Again, it depends on how quickly your photos are discovered, how good they are, how affordable they are and of course, on what people need.
Q: Do I have to invest anything? A: In some cases, yes. There are many websites that allow you to upload photos for free, or try a demo of their services, but many require either a one time buy or a regular subscription.
Q: What is the best solution for selling photos online? A: Both ways have their advantages, what it boils down to is the time you plan on investing in this and of course, the budget.

Tips on selling your pictures online

Even though the concept of selling pictures online is pretty straightforward, there are some aspects that you should consider. By following these simple guidelines you will get a head start in your endeavor and make a name for yourself. After all, being known by people is half of the way, and once you make yourself known to the customers, you will have better chances of selling your photos.
Before you start selling your pictures online, you might want to do a little reading on photography and composition, as you will need these skills to later take good pictures. Also, if you are using Adobe Photoshop to compose or edit photos, then look at a few tutorials and learn how to use it.

Where to sell pictures online?

There are two ways to go about selling your pictures online. First off there are websites that allow you to open an account and upload your photos to your gallery. These websites are used by thousands of photographers and customers and offer a simple and effective way to sell photos online.
The other type of websites or services that you can use to sell your photos online is the online portfolio builder, where you use the dedicated tools to create your own website and have your own gallery. This allows users to better customize their pages and have nice looking websites that reflect the type of pictures they want to sell.

Websites to upload and sell your pictures

There are a number of websites where you can sell pictures but keep in mind that you can only sell pictures that belong to you. If you have some awesome pictures that you have taken, these websites will be of help if you wish to sell them and make a profit out of your hobby. This type of websites has some advantages that make them suited for certain users:
Although these websites are simple and free to use, keep in mind that they hold hundreds of thousands of images, and getting yours sold might take a while. Now that you know what these websites can do for you and how to use them, here are some examples of good markets where you can bring your photos to sell them:

Websites to create online personal portfolios

Keep in mind that not only digital copies of your images can be sold. If you have some great shots and some basic Photoshop skills, you can make your own Print on Demand website and sell your photos as greeting cards or paintings. Also, there are a number of services that will allow you to create a portfolio and upload your photos to a hosting server. From these websites, you will be able to sell your photos easily to customers. Here are some of the highlights of these services:
While these services allow anyone to create a professional portfolio, most of them are not free, and sooner or later, users will have to pay a subscription. Also, they will have to do some research on how to run a blog and make it popular if they want their pictures to show up in web searches. If you are interested in such solutions, here are a few to get you started:
These are only a few of the tools that you will use in your pursuit to sell your pictures, as there are many other tools out there that might help you. Remember to do solid research before you commit to a service or a website and try to use well known services that others have used and recommended.

submitted by JV_info to making_money_online [link] [comments]

Die Definition von Bitcoin | knaken

Bitcoin ist bekannt als die erste dezentralisierte elektronische Währung, es sind im Grunde Münzen, die mit dem Web verschickt werden können. 2009 war das Jahr, in dem Bitcoin geboren wurde. Der Name des Herstellers ist unbekannt, aber der Künstlername Satoshi Nakamoto wurde ihm oder ihr gegeben.Bitcoin kaufen
Die Vorteile von Bitcoin.
Bitcoin-Transaktionen werden direkt von Mensch zu Mensch über das Netz durchgeführt. Es gibt keine Notwendigkeit für ein Finanzinstitut oder eine Clearingstelle, um als Zwischenhändler zu fungieren. Dank dessen sind die Transaktionsgebühren zu stark reduziert, sie können in allen Ländern der Welt genutzt werden. Bitcoin-Konten können nicht vereist werden, Voraussetzungen für ihre Eröffnung gibt es nicht, ebenso wenig wie Einschränkungen. Täglich beginnen viel mehr Anbieter, sie zu genehmigen. Sie können damit alles kaufen, was Sie wünschen.
Wie Bitcoin funktioniert.
Es ist möglich, Dollar, Euro oder verschiedene andere Gelder in Bitcoin umzutauschen. Sie können sozusagen jedes beliebige andere Geld aus anderen Ländern kaufen und verkaufen. Um Ihre Bitcoins zu behalten, müssen Sie sie in einer so genannten Geldbörse aufbewahren. Diese Geldbörse befindet sich in Ihrem Computer, Ihrem Mobiltelefon oder auf Websites von Drittanbietern. Das Versenden von Bitmünzen ist sehr einfach. Es ist so einfach wie das Versenden einer E-Mail. Mit Bitmünzen können Sie fast alles kaufen.
Warum Bitmünzen?
Bitcoin kann anonym verwendet werden, um jede Art von Waren zu erhalten. Internationale Abrechnungen sind sowohl sehr einfach als auch sehr billig. Das liegt daran, dass Bitmünzen nicht wirklich an ein bestimmtes Land gebunden sind. Sie sind von jeder Art von Politik ausgenommen. Kleine Unternehmen lieben sie, da keine Kreditkartengebühren anfallen. Es gibt Personen, die Bitmünzen nur zu Investitionszwecken kaufen und erwarten, dass sie ihren Wert steigern.
Möglichkeiten, Bitmünzen zu erhalten.
1) Kaufen Sie an einer Börse: Es ist erlaubt, Bitmünzen von Websites zu kaufen oder zu verkaufen, die Bitmünzen-Börsen genannt werden. Sie tun dies, indem sie ihre Landeswährungen oder jede andere Art von Währung, die sie haben oder wie sie es tun, verwenden.
2) Überweisungen: Personen können sich Bitmünzen einfach per Handy, Computer oder über Online-Systeme untereinander verschicken. Es ist dasselbe wie das Senden von Geld auf digitalem Wege.
3) Bergbau: Das Netzwerk wird durch jemanden geschützt, der sich "Bergarbeiter" nennt. Sie werden häufig für alle neu verifizierten Geschäfte ausgezeichnet. Diese Transaktionen werden vollständig verifiziert und dann in einem so genannten öffentlichen, klaren Journal aufgezeichnet. Diese Leute behaupten, diese Bitmünzen abzubauen, indem sie Hardware verwenden, um schwierige mathematische Probleme zu lösen. Bergleute geben viel Geld für Hardware aus. Heutzutage gibt es etwas, das man Cloud Mining nennt. Durch den Einsatz von Cloud Mining geben die Bergleute einfach Geld in Websites von Drittanbietern aus, diese Websites liefern alle benötigten Einrichtungen, wodurch die Ausgaben für Ausrüstung und auch für den Energieverbrauch gesenkt werden.
Das spart und spart auch Bitmünzen.
Diese Bitmünzen werden in so genannten digitalen Taschenbüchern aufbewahrt. Diese Budgets existieren in der Cloud oder in den Computern der Menschen. Ein Portemonnaie ist so etwas wie ein virtuelles Girokonto. Diese Taschenbücher ermöglichen es Personen, Bitmünzen zu senden oder zu empfangen, für Punkte auszugeben oder die Bitmünzen einfach zu konservieren. Im Gegensatz zu Bankkonten werden diese Bitcoin-Brieftaschen niemals von der FDIC garantiert.
Arten von Budgets.
1) Pocketbook in der Wolke: Der Vorteil einer Brieftasche in der Wolke besteht darin, dass der Einzelne keine Software auf seinem Computer installieren und keine langwierigen Synchronisierungsprozeduren abwarten muss. Der Nachteil ist, dass die Cloud gehackt werden kann, und dass der Einzelne seine Bitcoins verlieren kann. Diese Websites sind jedoch wirklich sicher.
2) Budget für das Computersystem: Der Vorteil eines Taschenbuchs auf dem Computer ist, dass die Leute ihre Bitmünzen vor dem Rest des Netzes geschützt aufbewahren. Der Nachteil ist, dass sie durch Formatierung des Computersystems oder durch Infektionen gelöscht werden könnten.
Datenschutz für Bitmünzen.
Wenn man eine Bitcoin-Transaktion durchführt, ist es nicht erforderlich, den echten Namen der Person anzugeben. Jeder der Bitcoin-Käufe wird in einem so genannten öffentlichen Protokoll aufgezeichnet. Dieses Protokoll besteht nur aus Budget-IDs und nicht aus den Namen von Personen. Jede Transaktion ist also im Grunde genommen persönlich. Einzelpersonen können Punkte kaufen und verkaufen, ohne dass sie verfolgt werden.
submitted by knakenge to u/knakenge [link] [comments]

Which are your Top 5 favourite coins out of the Top 100? An analysis.

I am putting together my investment portfolio for 2018 and made a complete summary of the current Top 100. Interestingly, I noticed that all coins can be categorized into 12 markets. Which markets do you think will play the biggest role in the coming year?
Here is a complete overview of all coins in an excel sheet including name, market, TPS, risk profile, time since launch (negative numbers mean that they are launching that many months in the future) and market cap. You can also sort by all of these fields of course. Coins written in bold are the strongest contenders within their market either due to having the best technology or having a small market cap and still excellent technology and potential. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1s8PHcNvvjuy848q18py_CGcu8elRGQAUIf86EYh4QZo/edit#gid=0
The 12 markets are
  1. Currency 13 coins
  2. Platform 25 coins
  3. Ecosystem 9 coins
  4. Privacy 10 coins
  5. Currency Exchange Tool 8 coins
  6. Gaming & Gambling 5 coins
  7. Misc 15 coins
  8. Social Network 4 coins
  9. Fee Token 3 coins
  10. Decentralized Data Storage 4 coins
  11. Cloud Computing 3 coins
  12. Stable Coin 2 coins
Before we look at the individual markets, we need to take a look of the overall market and its biggest issue scalability first:
Cryptocurrencies aim to be a decentralized currency that can be used worldwide. Its goal is to replace dollar, Euro, Yen, all FIAT currencies worldwide. The coin that will achieve that will be worth several trillion dollars.
Bitcoin can only process 7 transactions per second (TPS). In order to replace all FIAT, it would need to perform at at least VISA levels, which usually processes around 3,000 TPS, up to 25,000 TPS during peak times and a maximum of 64,000 TPS. That means that this cryptocurrency would need to be able to perform at least several thousand TPS. However, a ground breaking technology should not look at current technology to set a goal for its use, i.e. estimating the number of emails sent in 1990 based on the number of faxes sent wasn’t a good estimate.
For that reason, 10,000 TPS is the absolute baseline for a cryptocurrency that wants to replace FIAT. This brings me to IOTA, which wants to connect all 80 billion IoT devices that are expected to exist by 2025, which constantly communicate with each other, creating 80 billion or more transactions per second. This is the benchmark that cryptocurrencies should be aiming for. Currently, 8 billion devices are connected to the Internet.
With its Lightning network recently launched, Bitcoin is realistically looking at 50,000 possible soon. Other notable cryptocurrencies besides IOTA and Bitcoin are Nano with 7,000 TPS already tested, Dash with several billion TPS possible with Masternodes, Neo, LISK and RHOC with 100,000 TPS by 2020, Ripple with 50,000 TPS, Ethereum with 10,000 with Sharding.
However, it needs to be said that scalability usually goes at the cost of decentralization and security. So, it needs to be seen, which of these technologies can prove itself resilient and performant.
Without further ado, here are the coins of the first market

Market 1 - Currency:

  1. Bitcoin: 1st generation blockchain with currently bad scalability currently, though the implementation of the Lightning Network looks promising and could alleviate most scalability concerns, scalability and high energy use.
  2. Ripple: Centralized currency that might become very successful due to tight involvement with banks and cross-border payments for financial institutions; banks and companies like Western Union and Moneygram (who they are currently working with) as customers customers. However, it seems they are aiming for more decentralization now.https://ripple.com/dev-blog/decentralization-strategy-update/. Has high TPS due to Proof of Correctness algorithm.
  3. Bitcoin Cash: Bitcoin fork with the difference of having an 8 times bigger block size, making it 8 times more scalable than Bitcoin currently. Further block size increases are planned. Only significant difference is bigger block size while big blocks lead to further problems that don't seem to do well beyond a few thousand TPS. Opponents to a block size argue that increasing the block size limit is unimaginative, offers only temporary relief, and damages decentralization by increasing costs of participation. In order to preserve decentralization, system requirements to participate should be kept low. To understand this, consider an extreme example: very big blocks (1GB+) would require data center level resources to validate the blockchain. This would preclude all but the wealthiest individuals from participating.Community seems more open than Bitcoin's though.
  4. Litecoin : Little brother of Bitcoin. Bitcoin fork with different mining algorithm but not much else.Copies everything that Bitcoin does pretty much. Lack of real innovation.
  5. Dash: Dash (Digital Cash) is a fork of Bitcoin and focuses on user ease. It has very fast transactions within seconds, low fees and uses Proof of Service from Masternodes for consensus. They are currently building a system called Evolution which will allow users to send money using usernames and merchants will find it easy to integrate Dash using the API. You could say Dash is trying to be a PayPal of cryptocurrencies. Currently, cryptocurrencies must choose between decentralization, speed, scalability and can pick only 2. With Masternodes, Dash picked speed and scalability at some cost of decentralization, since with Masternodes the voting power is shifted towards Masternodes, which are run by Dash users who own the most Dash.
  6. IOTA: 3rd generation blockchain called Tangle, which has a high scalability, no fees and instant transactions. IOTA aims to be the connective layer between all 80 billion IOT devices that are expected to be connected to the Internet in 2025, possibly creating 80 billion transactions per second or 800 billion TPS, who knows. However, it needs to be seen if the Tangle can keep up with this scalability and iron out its security issues that have not yet been completely resolved.
  7. Nano: 3rd generation blockchain called Block Lattice with high scalability, no fees and instant transactions. Unlike IOTA, Nano only wants to be a payment processor and nothing else, for now at least. With Nano, every user has their own blockchain and has to perform a small amount of computing for each transaction, which makes Nano perform at 300 TPS with no problems and 7,000 TPS have also been tested successfully. Very promising 3rd gen technology and strong focus on only being the fastest currency without trying to be everything.
  8. Decred: As mining operations have grown, Bitcoin’s decision-making process has become more centralized, with the largest mining companies holding large amounts of power over the Bitcoin improvement process. Decred focuses heavily on decentralization with their PoW Pos hybrid governance system to become what Bitcoin was set out to be. They will soon implement the Lightning Network to scale up. While there do not seem to be more differences to Bitcoin besides the novel hybrid consensus algorithm, which Ethereum, Aeternity and Bitcoin Atom are also implementing, the welcoming and positive Decred community and professoinal team add another level of potential to the coin.
  9. Aeternity: We’ve seen recently, that it’s difficult to scale the execution of smart contracts on the blockchain. Crypto Kitties is a great example. Something as simple as creating and trading unique assets on Ethereum bogged the network down when transaction volume soared. Ethereum and Zilliqa address this problem with Sharding. Aeternity focuses on increasing the scalability of smart contracts and dapps by moving smart contracts off-chain. Instead of running on the blockchain, smart contracts on Aeternity run in private state channels between the parties involved in the contracts. State channels are lines of communication between parties in a smart contract. They don’t touch the blockchain unless they need to for adjudication or transfer of value. Because they’re off-chain, state channel contracts can operate much more efficiently. They don’t need to pay the network for every time they compute and can also operate with greater privacy. An important aspect of smart contract and dapp development is access to outside data sources. This could mean checking the weather in London, score of a football game, or price of gold. Oracles provide access to data hosted outside the blockchain. In many blockchain projects, oracles represent a security risk and potential point of failure, since they tend to be singular, centralized data streams. Aeternity proposes decentralizing oracles with their oracle machine. Doing so would make outside data immutable and unchangeable once it reaches Aeternity’s blockchain. Of course, the data source could still be hacked, so Aeternity implements a prediction market where users can bet on the accuracy and honesty of incoming data from various oracles.It also uses prediction markets for various voting and verification purposes within the platform. Aeternity’s network runs on on a hybrid of proof of work and proof of stake. Founded by a long-time crypto-enthusiast and early colleague of Vitalik Buterin, Yanislav Malahov. Promising concept though not product yet
  10. Bitcoin Atom: Atomic Swaps and hybrid consenus. This looks like the only Bitcoin clone that actually is looking to innovate next to Bitcoin Cash.
  11. Dogecoin: Litecoin fork, fantastic community, though lagging behind a bit in technology.
  12. Bitcoin Gold: A bit better security than bitcoin through ASIC resistant algorithm, but that's it. Not that interesting.
  13. Digibyte: Digibyte's PoS blockchain is spread over a 100,000+ servers, phones, computers, and nodes across the globe, aiming for the ultimate level of decentralization. DigiByte rebalances the load between the five mining algorithms by adjusting the difficulty of each so one algorithm doesn’t become dominant. The algorithm's asymmetric difficulty has gained notoriety and been deployed in many other blockchains.DigiByte’s adoption over the past four years has been slow. It’s still a relatively obscure currency compared its competitors. The DigiByte website offers a lot of great marketing copy and buzzwords. However, there’s not much technical information about what they have planned for the future. You could say Digibyte is like Bitcoin, but with shorter blocktimes and a multi-algorithm. However, that's not really a difference big enough to truly set themselves apart from Bitcoin, since these technologies could be implemented by any blockchain without much difficulty. Their decentralization is probably their strongest asset, however, this also change quickly if the currency takes off and big miners decide to go into Digibyte.
  14. Bitcoin Diamond Asic resistant Bitcoin and Copycat

Market 2 - Platform

Most of the cryptos here have smart contracts and allow dapps (Decentralized apps) to be build on their platform and to use their token as an exchange of value between dapp services.
  1. Ethereum: 2nd generation blockchain that allows the use of smart contracts. Bad scalability currently, though this concern could be alleviated by the soon to be implemented Lightning Network aka Plasma and its Sharding concept.
  2. EOS: Promising technology that wants to be able do everything, from smart contracts like Ethereum, scalability similar to Nano with 1000 tx/second + near instant transactions and zero fees, to also wanting to be a platform for dapps. However, EOS doesn't have a product yet and everything is just promises still. Highly overvalued right now. However, there are lots of red flags, have dumped $500 million Ether over the last 2 months and possibly bought back EOS to increase the size of their ICO, which has been going on for over a year and has raised several billion dollars. All in all, their market cap is way too high for that and not even having a product.
  3. Cardano: Similar to Ethereum/EOS, however, only promises made with no delivery yet, highly overrated right now. Interesting concept though. Market cap way too high for not even having a product. Somewhat promising technology.
  4. VeChain: Singapore-based project that’s building a business enterprise platform and inventory tracking system. Examples are verifying genuine luxury goods and food supply chains. Has one of the strongest communities in the crypto world. Most hyped token of all, with merit though.
  5. Neo: Neo is a platform, similar to Eth, but more extensive, allowing dapps and smart contracts, but with a different smart contract gas system, consensus mechanism (PoS vs. dBfT), governance model, fixed vs unfixed supply, expensive contracts vs nearly free contracts, different ideologies for real world adoption. There are currently only 9 nodes, each of which are being run by a company/entity hand selected by the NEO council (most of which are located in china) and are under contract. This means that although the locations of the nodes may differ, ultimately the neo council can bring them down due to their legal contracts. In fact this has been done in the past when the neo council was moving 50 million neo that had been locked up. Also dbft (or neo's implmentation of it) has failed underload causing network outages during major icos. The first step in decentralization is that the NEO Counsel will select trusted nodes (Universities, business partners, etc.) and slowly become less centralized that way. The final step in decentralization will be allowing NEO holders to vote for new nodes, similar to a DPoS system (ARK/EOS/LISK). NEO has a regulation/government friendly ideology. Finally they are trying to work undewith the Chinese government in regards to regulations. If for some reason they wanted it shut down, they could just shut